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Arimnestos is a farm boy when war breaks out between the citizens of his native Plataea and and their overbearing neighbours, Thebes. Standing in the battle line - the wall of bronze - for the first time, alongside his father and brother, he shares in a famous and unlikely victory. But after being knocked unconscious in the melee, he awakes not a hero, but a slave. Betraye Arimnestos is a farm boy when war breaks out between the citizens of his native Plataea and and their overbearing neighbours, Thebes. Standing in the battle line - the wall of bronze - for the first time, alongside his father and brother, he shares in a famous and unlikely victory. But after being knocked unconscious in the melee, he awakes not a hero, but a slave. Betrayed by his jealous and cowardly cousin, the freedom he fought for has now vanished, and he becomes the property of a rich citizen of Ephesus. So begins an epic journey from slavery that takes the young Arimnestos through a world poised on the brink of an epic confrontation, as the emerging civilization of the Greeks starts to flex its muscles against the established empire of the Persians. As he tries to make his fortune and revenge himself on the man who disinherited him, Arimnestos discovers that he has a talent that pays well in this new, violent world, for like his hero, Achilles, he is 'a killer of men'.


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Arimnestos is a farm boy when war breaks out between the citizens of his native Plataea and and their overbearing neighbours, Thebes. Standing in the battle line - the wall of bronze - for the first time, alongside his father and brother, he shares in a famous and unlikely victory. But after being knocked unconscious in the melee, he awakes not a hero, but a slave. Betraye Arimnestos is a farm boy when war breaks out between the citizens of his native Plataea and and their overbearing neighbours, Thebes. Standing in the battle line - the wall of bronze - for the first time, alongside his father and brother, he shares in a famous and unlikely victory. But after being knocked unconscious in the melee, he awakes not a hero, but a slave. Betrayed by his jealous and cowardly cousin, the freedom he fought for has now vanished, and he becomes the property of a rich citizen of Ephesus. So begins an epic journey from slavery that takes the young Arimnestos through a world poised on the brink of an epic confrontation, as the emerging civilization of the Greeks starts to flex its muscles against the established empire of the Persians. As he tries to make his fortune and revenge himself on the man who disinherited him, Arimnestos discovers that he has a talent that pays well in this new, violent world, for like his hero, Achilles, he is 'a killer of men'.

30 review for Killer of Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    Since I'm starting second book I decided to polish a bit review for the first book. I was planing on writing about this book for long time but I simply can't way to properly share fascination with this book so this review might be edited when I find a way do this book justice. After finishing Red knight I wanted to see authors other work and this book caught my eye right away. Killer of men is historical fiction but I can't help being reminded of fantasy book, most of all grimdark and military fant Since I'm starting second book I decided to polish a bit review for the first book. I was planing on writing about this book for long time but I simply can't way to properly share fascination with this book so this review might be edited when I find a way do this book justice. After finishing Red knight I wanted to see authors other work and this book caught my eye right away. Killer of men is historical fiction but I can't help being reminded of fantasy book, most of all grimdark and military fantasy. We got gifted protagonist in his coming of age story who grows to be flawed (anti)hero. Book is set during the first Greco-Persian war and follows events that precede it as well as war itself.Story is seen through eyes of Arimnestos of Plataea (who actually existed and is consider to be one of the sources for Herodotus) in retrospective tells it to his daughter and her companions.This is his personal story and we see events, culture, with all good, bad and ugly parts, and historical figures as he perceives them.We learn a lot about culture, customs and technology of that time. Cameron he obviously knows lot about that stuff which also shows in Traitor son cycle but unlike many authors he doesn't feel urge to shower you with info dumps, instead he weaves them organically into his story. If I have to nitpick I would say maybe choice do this story in first person retrospective is kind of questionable or could have been done better.Other than that everything is great. Characters are complex, dialogues are well written, combat is superbly well done, both individual combat and large scale warfare, and book is set in one very fascinating period during big clash of cultures. Overall a great book and I would recommend it those interested in this period as well as fans of military fiction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    From the way it started, I didn't think I'd enjoy it but it ended up being a really good story. So the whole book is this father telling his daughter about his life as she writes it down. At first, I thought, "No way is this going to be interesting," but very quickly it drew me in and had me hooked. Even though there are a couple of places where the story loses a bit of momentum they didn't last long. The main character, Arimnestos, is tremendously interesting. Growing from a small boy to a From the way it started, I didn't think I'd enjoy it but it ended up being a really good story. So the whole book is this father telling his daughter about his life as she writes it down. At first, I thought, "No way is this going to be interesting," but very quickly it drew me in and had me hooked. Even though there are a couple of places where the story loses a bit of momentum they didn't last long. The main character, Arimnestos, is tremendously interesting. Growing from a small boy to a young adult and going through things that would break most normal people. The only drawback for me personally was all the historical names. I found myself getting some of the characters with similar names mixed up. Other readers may not have this issue. The plot, well there really isn't one, other than Arimnestos' life. Don't get me wrong that doesn't mean the story is boring, far from it. It just follows his life as he starts life as a boy growing up on a farm. His father also works as a metalsmith which both Arimnestos and his brother begin to learn. But soon war breaks out and Arimnestos joins with his father and brother and stands in the battle lines to fight. At only twelve it's hard to believe he is even asked to join the battle. How history has changed what we ask our children to do! That's how the entire book is. Battle after battle. Arimnestos growing and learning, becoming better at killing. Hence the title of the book.  I am very much looking forward to the second book in the series!

  3. 5 out of 5

    S.J.A. Turney

    To begin at the beginning… How many series have you read where you pick up the first book to find an iron-hard, three-dimensional, experienced and world-weary hero awaiting you? They are, barring the anti-hero, the best characters to both read and write. But how often do you get to see that hero created? That is what Killer of Men is. In terms of superhero movies, this is a great hero’s ‘origin story’. It is the very creation of a hero. Or possibly not quite a hero. After all, an instinctive kill To begin at the beginning… How many series have you read where you pick up the first book to find an iron-hard, three-dimensional, experienced and world-weary hero awaiting you? They are, barring the anti-hero, the best characters to both read and write. But how often do you get to see that hero created? That is what Killer of Men is. In terms of superhero movies, this is a great hero’s ‘origin story’. It is the very creation of a hero. Or possibly not quite a hero. After all, an instinctive killer, drawn to war like iron filings to a magnet is not by definition the same as a hero. Moreover, the book is set during one of the greatest clashes of culture in the history of the world: Greece vs. Persia. But again, in the same way as the novel is the story of the origin of the hero, it is also the story of the origin of that war (it is called the Long War saga for a reason. This was a loooooong war.) And that means that Killer of Men takes place during the Ionian revolt at the very beginning of the great Greek/Persian war. So what of the actual story? Arimnestos is an ordinary boy. He is the son of a talented blacksmith who has also had the honour and duty of standing as a hoplite in the line of battle for his small city-state of Plataea. As his city is inevitably dragged into the world stage via a perhaps unwise allegiance with the upcoming demos of Athens, Arimnestos begins a journey of his own. In sickening blurb terms, one might say: from zero to hero. Sent from his family to study with a retired warrior, Arimnestos learns the skills of the soldier and the hunter, but despite that, not yet the ‘killer of men’ for which the book is named. As the wheel of time turns and he grows to young manhood, the Plataean finds himself in battle against the greatest warriors of his age, the Spartans, on the Athenian flank. Following the battle and a betrayal by one of his own, Arimnestos finds himself alone, with a dead father and brother and sold into slavery. But here his journey really begins. As a slave (and companion to a young noble) in Ephesus, Arimnestos learns from one of the greatest philosophers of the ancient world, improves his battle skills and is introduced on a very personal level to the Persian people and their leaders. Well, I won’t spoil the story. But Arimnestos has been a blacksmith’s son, a soldier, and then a slave. He will also be a ship’s navarch, a sportsman, a war-hero, an avenger, and so much more as he succumbs to fate and becomes the killer of men that is his destiny. But throughout the whole tale of his growth to manhood, there is always the background thread that Arimnestos was betrayed, disinherited and sold as a slave. And we know from early in the book that this situation will have to be resolved before the end. Well that’s the book and the plot and the hero. As for the style? Is anyone not familiar yet with Christian Cameron’s fluid and absorbing work? He writes masterpieces or nothing at all. In technical terms, while my own knowledge of the world of ancient Greece is much scanter than my knowledge of Rome, I have yet to trip him up with any fact, and he has taught me so much through his writing. He knows his subject thoroughly. He is conversant to an undreamed of extent. Moreover, Cameron is both a reenactor and a military veteran, both of which lend a huge level of authenticity to his scenes of strife. And I mean to a level that few civilians could ever hope to touch. Cameron is, for me, a composite of all I like in my ancient novels. He can write the stink, terror and chaos of battle as well as Ben Kane, the cameraderie and humour like Tony Riches, the depth of character and inrigue like Douglas Jacskon and the sheer emotion like Manda Scott. As such, he is capable of producing work that speaks to readers of all forms of historical fiction, to every facet of a reader’s soul. Killer of Men is the saga of a young man driven to the edge of reason and finding in his darkest hour the clarity of the born warrior. It is a tale of growth and of finding oneself, and of revenge and heroism. It is everything you could want in historical fiction. I cannot recommend the Long War series highly enough.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Gwynne

    A great read. Loved the balance between character, pace and plot, with a complete sense of place. It read somewhere in between Bernard Cornwell and David Gemmell. Loved it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bell

    I have heard a ton of praise for Christian Cameron and had high hopes when I started to read "Killer of Men", my first novel by this ex-military aviator and intelligence officer. Too bad it pretty much sucks. And it sucks in very particular way, it could have been kick-ass awesome "Men in Miniskirts" -novel with a lot bloody action and both land and sea battles. But the author does his damnest to irritate the hell out of you while reading this otherwise pretty cool story about a young farmer who I have heard a ton of praise for Christian Cameron and had high hopes when I started to read "Killer of Men", my first novel by this ex-military aviator and intelligence officer. Too bad it pretty much sucks. And it sucks in very particular way, it could have been kick-ass awesome "Men in Miniskirts" -novel with a lot bloody action and both land and sea battles. But the author does his damnest to irritate the hell out of you while reading this otherwise pretty cool story about a young farmer who becomes a slave and then flawed hero. In the novel the protagonist tells his story as an old man to, I guess, his daughter and son, and while telling the tale, he does: 1. Ask for more wine. 2. Make a lame comment about sex to make a young lady blush. 3. State that he is a Killer of Men. Over and over, and then some more. And not only in the beginning or end of chapter, but everywhere! Cameron thanks his editors in his afterword, and one has to wonder, for what? Not doing their jobs?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Freakout

    One of the best books I've read lately, highly recommended!!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Liviu

    Another excellent novel from the author after the 3 Tyrant books which i enjoyed all; a first person narration from Arimnestos of Plataea as told to his young daughter and companions, in the hero's old age when he seems to be a noble of some sort in Thrace It covers his young years, training under an old soldier and killer of men himself and later his begging soldiering in the week of 3 battles when the Athenians and the Plateans face 3 enemy armies and defeat all However young Arimnestos is wound Another excellent novel from the author after the 3 Tyrant books which i enjoyed all; a first person narration from Arimnestos of Plataea as told to his young daughter and companions, in the hero's old age when he seems to be a noble of some sort in Thrace It covers his young years, training under an old soldier and killer of men himself and later his begging soldiering in the week of 3 battles when the Athenians and the Plateans face 3 enemy armies and defeat all However young Arimnestos is wounded and cowardly betrayed and sold into slavery to Ephesus where by chance he is taken by rich merchant and poet Hyponnax as companion to his son Archilagos Here he grows to manhood in a sort of luxury slavery but the conflict with Persia is looming on the horizon... Superb world building and a very convincing narrator's voice this is as good as anything I've read by the author. For some reason though the book stops just short of blowing me away as other historical fiction did and I cannot figure why - maybe the author' style is a bit dry, maybe there is a bit too much soap in the relationships in Hyponnax household which will reverberate to the future, but I think the novel is missing something to make it a top-top one of mine. I am in for the duration of the series of course and I really liked it and highly recommend it Updated FBC rv here: http://fantasybookcritic.blogspot.com...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    The Style is that of an old storyteller - in this case the hero, who interjects every so oft into the story. His story starts as a boy in Plataea, his father being a renowned Bronze Smith where after a period of scene setting of a peaceable life as a farmboy they encounter Miltiados & war soon looms as they ally with the Athenians. There is plenty more to tell but wont spoil for you & will leave it to say that Spartans, phalanx warfare, slavery & servitude, Persians (Medes empire), Phonicians, nav The Style is that of an old storyteller - in this case the hero, who interjects every so oft into the story. His story starts as a boy in Plataea, his father being a renowned Bronze Smith where after a period of scene setting of a peaceable life as a farmboy they encounter Miltiados & war soon looms as they ally with the Athenians. There is plenty more to tell but wont spoil for you & will leave it to say that Spartans, phalanx warfare, slavery & servitude, Persians (Medes empire), Phonicians, naval battles, sea voyages on the Great Green, olympic style games, duels, politics, land battles et al are involved in atale which sees our hero go from young boy to manhood. It really is a good strong story, well told & plenny to like about it & for me a solid 4.5 rating.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    On paper this looked like the kind of book I would eat up. Ancient setting, battles, swords and sandals type historical fiction. Yet, I couldn't finish it. In truth I barely started it having only reached page 120 (plus a flick through the next 100 pages to see if it improved). I'm not going to hold anything against this book. It is written okay, but the author's 'storyteller' style was not compatible with me. I simply couldn't connect and it was disorienting.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tudor Ciocarlie

    Probably the best historical-fiction novel I have ever read. I've loved how Cameron managed to create interesting female characters, with powerful agendas, even in that male dominated era. This should be a lesson for an important part of the epic-fantasy writers that uses the realism of the past as a stupid excuse to write atrocious acts and poor developed female characters.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I really like his other series better which prevented me from enjoying this book for the first 85%. The last 15% (after a long pause) was really good. Hoping to continue the series sometime soonish!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kareem

    This is the sixth book I have read by Christian and I am happy to report it didn't disappoint. As with God of War and The Traitor Son Cycle I was impressed with how vividly his worlds come off the page. For me, there is no one who writes a battle quite like this man, but I am equally impressed with how committed I am to his main characters through their early development. Arimnestos has many qualities ordinary people would not consider good, or even likable, but through Cameron's engaging story This is the sixth book I have read by Christian and I am happy to report it didn't disappoint. As with God of War and The Traitor Son Cycle I was impressed with how vividly his worlds come off the page. For me, there is no one who writes a battle quite like this man, but I am equally impressed with how committed I am to his main characters through their early development. Arimnestos has many qualities ordinary people would not consider good, or even likable, but through Cameron's engaging story telling I found that I cared deeply for the outcomes of Arimnestos' various tribulations. For me a main character can be good, bad or anywhere between so long as that they have the stuff to keep me hooked, and is in some way remarkable, but not perfect, indeed they should be flawed. I mean, do you know anyone who could claim to be perfect? I feel Arimnestos ticked all those boxes. The book isn't that big but is packed full of exciting content, the like of which I haven't seen since the late and great David Gemmell. I very much look forward to reading the remainder of the series, four of which books currently sit on my shelf. Great read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Graham

    I’d had ‘Killer of Men’ on my ‘to read’ shelf for quite some time. I like historical fiction, I’d say at a rough guess it constitutes between 10% and 20% of my total reading. When the genre is at its best in such books as Falls the Shadow, Shakespeare's Rebel (see my review https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) or Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae to name a few, it transports the reader to a different time and a totally different existence than modern day. ‘Killer of I’d had ‘Killer of Men’ on my ‘to read’ shelf for quite some time. I like historical fiction, I’d say at a rough guess it constitutes between 10% and 20% of my total reading. When the genre is at its best in such books as Falls the Shadow, Shakespeare's Rebel (see my review https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) or Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae to name a few, it transports the reader to a different time and a totally different existence than modern day. ‘Killer of Men’ is, in my opinion, in this top echelon. Like the aforementioned ‘Gates of Fire’ this book deals with the Greek-Persian struggle. The story follows a young man called Arimnestos from Plataea who falls in battle amongst the Greek states where his town is supporting Athens. He finds himself sold into slavery to a Greek aristocrat, Hipponax, in the Persian controlled city of Ephesus in Ionia. Arimnestos had formerly received some combat training from a warrior-hermit and his ability leads his new owner to appoint him as companion to his son, Archilogos. Together Arimnestos and his charge become more and more proficient in arms and the closest of friends. The story is told in the first person with Arimnestos as an old man recounting the tale of his life to his daughter and her friends. Two observations by the older Arimnestos are particularly noteworthy. The first is that although he was a slave and yearned to be a free man, his life was very comfortable with a minimum of hardship; his owners treated him very well. The other is that, the Ionian Greeks while nominally under Persian rule, had great autonomy and the Persian influence is benign. Consequently Ephesus and the other cities were better off than a lot of the Greek cities in Greece which are run self-servingly by a ruling elite. Arimnestos falls for the daughter of Hipponax, Briseis, and after an act to avenge her honour Arimnestos has to flee Ephesus. Hipponax grants him his freedom before he flees. The Ionian Greeks rise up in rebellion against Persia and the freed Arimnestos finds himself battling on their side in the war. Through a cruel misunderstanding he incurs the enduring enmity of his friend Archilogos. I won’t spoil the story anymore, I’ll just say a few of the things which stood out. The characterisation of the self-centred Greek aristocrats is very well done, they are happy to go to war and sacrifice the lives of their men for what are pretty much vain or selfish reasons. The frustration the Persian Satrap has with the chaffing of the Ionian Greeks under Persian rule is clear, he cannot understand why they would prefer the petty rule of Athens and her allies to the ‘light touch’ rule of the Persian King. The battle scenes are incredibly well-drawn, as are the single combat pieces. Like C. C. Humphreys with Elizabethan weaponry, Cameron is knowledgeable and has had training with the weapons of the ancient Greeks and this shines through. Finally, Arimnestos as an older man telling the story has accepted that he is a rarity, a natural killer. In keeping with his life and experiences, he is not tormented by this awareness but accepts it as a part of his makeup. ‘Killer of Men’ is first of a series of books about Arimnestos and I intend to read the rest, as well as looking for other series by Cameron.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patremagne

    http://abitterdraft.blogspot.com/2013... Killer of Men is the first in Christian Cameron's The Long War series, which outlines the conflict between the Greeks and the Persians around the 5th century BC. Killer of Men is centered primarily around the Ionian Revolt, and it makes for a great story. The story is told in the first person, though it's one where the protagonist narrates from old age. There seems to be an influx of novels that do this and it can be very hit or miss as to whether they turn http://abitterdraft.blogspot.com/2013... Killer of Men is the first in Christian Cameron's The Long War series, which outlines the conflict between the Greeks and the Persians around the 5th century BC. Killer of Men is centered primarily around the Ionian Revolt, and it makes for a great story. The story is told in the first person, though it's one where the protagonist narrates from old age. There seems to be an influx of novels that do this and it can be very hit or miss as to whether they turn out well. Some, like Pat Rothfuss's Kingkiller series, are narrated in the same way, but the narrator, Kvothe in this case, begins his tale and it essentially turns into a normal first person perspective until a new chapter where the Chronicler has run out of ink or some such thing and the novel returns to the present. In Killer of Men, Arimnestos of Plataea is the narrator, telling his story to his thugater, or daughter, and a group of her friends. Arimnestos interrupts himself in his telling many times each chapter, primarily to ask for wine or to comment on his daughter's blushing, and this annoyed me a little because it broke up the narration. The further in the novel I progressed, the more the style grew on me. Some stories are better told through a direct first person rather than a narration, and I think I really would have enjoyed this more if it weren't a narration. Despite this, Killer of Men only got better as the story moved along. We see Arimnestos develop from a young farm boy into a brutal killer of men, and from the moment he was betrayed and sold into slavery his development is kickstarted. Killers of men, as Cameron describes them, are very similar to David Gemmell's baresarks from his novel Legend - as soon as they have the scent of blood, they're a completely different person - and we see this in Arimnestos's often brutal recollections as well as how it affected him then and especially in the present. Throughout his time as a slave, he sees the stark contrast between his home of Plataea and Ionia. Cameron is adept at his worldbuilding, painting a superb picture of ancient Greece. Quick pacing - even in the parts that seem like they would be dull, great worldbuilding, and strong characters made Killer of Men a thoroughly entertaining read for me and should do the same for anyone even remotely interested in ancient Greece. Marathon: Freedom or Death is the second in the series, and as it was one of the most important battles of the era, I am very eager to read it and other works by Christian Cameron.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bennett

    I put off too long starting The Long War series by Christian Cameron. Killer of Men is the first installment of the epic story of East vs West, pitting the Greek city-states against the might of the Persian King of Kings. That is the backdrop to this thoroughly entertaining tale of one man's journey from his home in Plataea becoming a feared warrior, a killer of men. The author deftly constructs the world of Miltiades of Athens and Darius the Persian; the descriptions of everyday life, the detai I put off too long starting The Long War series by Christian Cameron. Killer of Men is the first installment of the epic story of East vs West, pitting the Greek city-states against the might of the Persian King of Kings. That is the backdrop to this thoroughly entertaining tale of one man's journey from his home in Plataea becoming a feared warrior, a killer of men. The author deftly constructs the world of Miltiades of Athens and Darius the Persian; the descriptions of everyday life, the detail in the battle scenes, the scope of heroism and betrayal displayed by well written characters - besides the protagonist, I especially enjoyed the portrayals of Briseis, a woman who will scheme with the best of them and of the philosopher Heraclitus (a personal aside - one of my favorite philosophical aphorisms comes from Heraclitus, the one about not being able to step into the same river twice). All of those elements propel Arimnestos from a lowly farm existence to his eventual status as a hero. As far as the war is concerned, this volume is an excellent stage setter for the next book, Marathon and I will not put off reading that one. 5 stars for Killer of Men.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vaelin

    Another great Christian Cameron book, will definitely read the next in the series as well as his other HF series!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Last month I had myself a real hankering for some historical fiction so after looking at the Toronto Public Library's website and I came across Killer of Men by Christian Cameron and thought why not? I love books written during this time period and it wasn't too long of a novel either. So, despite having a multitude of other novels that had to be read first I couldn't resist the appeal of this book for long and I ended up starting it the same day I brought it home. Right away I was drawn into Ar Last month I had myself a real hankering for some historical fiction so after looking at the Toronto Public Library's website and I came across Killer of Men by Christian Cameron and thought why not? I love books written during this time period and it wasn't too long of a novel either. So, despite having a multitude of other novels that had to be read first I couldn't resist the appeal of this book for long and I ended up starting it the same day I brought it home. Right away I was drawn into Arminestos' story and the way it was told. The book was told by Arminestos when he was an old man retelling the story of his life to his daughter as well as some of her companions for me the way it was told lent itself to the overall success of the story. I haven't come across this style of story telling very often and when I do it can be either hit or miss. However, with Killer of Men the author was bang on in the way he used this writing technique. Arminestos tells the story of his life from the time he was a small child to when he was a young man in his twenties and all the good, bad, happy, sad and extremely rough times in between. From being raised by a drunken mother, a distant father to that of being a slave after battle where he was sold out by his thieving and conniving cousin to the time he comes home to his roots after his aching heart can no longer resist the call of home. This was the first book I've read by the author and I was really impressed with it. I loved the way the story was told, the characters were wonderful and Arminestos is one of those hero's that makes you want to invest your time and energy into reading about even after the first book is finished. What I think really made the novel though was the history. The author has a degree in history and was in the United States Navy and you can tell his experience in both fields came in handy while he wrote this book and that Killer of Men is a book written with a lot of passion and love for history which I as a history lover can really appreciate. The skill in which he was able to depict ancient life and depict such an arduous and bloody war was impressive. The overall plot of the novel was great. There was murder, history, war, espionage, intrigue a little sex and some foul language in the book and it all came together in excellently written piece of historical fiction. I loved the blood and gore in the book and the tone in which Arminestos told his story to his daughter was wonderful. In conclusion the book was a wonderful read. While the way the story is told may not be for everyone I highly recommend this book to all those with a love for ancient history, historical fiction and don't mind a book with a lot of killing to go along with a rich historical tapestry. I'm so glad that I gave this author a try and I can't wait to read the next book in this series told by Arminestos written by Christian Cameron in the new year.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robin Carter

    This review is from: Killer of Men (Hardcover) When i started this book i was a little taken aback with the style, it was not what i had come to expect from Chris, that's not to say it was bad, it was just different, it was enough of a change to give me slight pause to think has the man lost it? should he have stuck with a winning formula like the tyrant series? None of this should make you stop reading, because as you carry on reading you suddenly find your self being pulled into the world or Ari This review is from: Killer of Men (Hardcover) When i started this book i was a little taken aback with the style, it was not what i had come to expect from Chris, that's not to say it was bad, it was just different, it was enough of a change to give me slight pause to think has the man lost it? should he have stuck with a winning formula like the tyrant series? None of this should make you stop reading, because as you carry on reading you suddenly find your self being pulled into the world or Arimnestos. Day one of reading this book and before i knew it it was 3 am and i really didn't want to put the book down. By the time i finished the book i had gone through a roller-coaster of emotions alongside my friend Arimnestos, i had lost sleep every night and been left reconsidering quite a few of his actions, what would i do it that situation? am i a good enough man to stand along side him, could i have stood in the storm of Bronze? This book is a truly brilliant piece of writing, not only is it a great escape from real life it is also a great exploration of the human soul and a sometimes deadlier, some times more civilised more enlightenment time . The other big authors of the genre will have to work damn hard this year to stop this being my book of the year. So the challenge has been made Mr's Scarrow, Iggulden and Co can you beat this? For you the readers...this is a must buy, If Christian does make it to the UK i will do my very best to secure Signed copies, but buy a copy of this book you cannot miss this book. 9/10 (always leave room for improvement no matter how good it is..LOL) (Parm)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    Exactly the kind of Historical Fiction I love to read. Awesome single POV character who is morally ambiguous- he is good but often does questionable things. I loved how the main character learns and grows throughout this book. I loved the time period and the supporting characters. Fantastic book, probably my favorite book so far this year.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Margareth8537

    The story is told by an old warrior to his grandchild-so we know he makes it. Real old soldier's story. Battles, defeat, slavery and hopefully he gets his own back. Very well written and nice to know there is another one available so you can move on.

  21. 4 out of 5

    James Cox

    This was fantastic. It reminded me of Spartacus, similar concept in terms of hero being turned into a slave. I can't wait for the next book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anton

    I was a big fan of Cameron's before I started this so I already knew I would like it, it's nice that he didn't disappoint me. The classical Greek world is not a period I know much about but this novel sure felt authentic and brought it to life in a very Sharpe-meets-the-Illiad type of way. In spite of the immersive atmosphere and the vivid battle scenes I soured on it about halfway through, however. Arimnestos became such a cunt after a while that I almost lost interest in going on, I felt as if I was a big fan of Cameron's before I started this so I already knew I would like it, it's nice that he didn't disappoint me. The classical Greek world is not a period I know much about but this novel sure felt authentic and brought it to life in a very Sharpe-meets-the-Illiad type of way. In spite of the immersive atmosphere and the vivid battle scenes I soured on it about halfway through, however. Arimnestos became such a cunt after a while that I almost lost interest in going on, I felt as if the author had lost all sense of moderation and just ran wild, but when I reached the final chapter it became clear that this was all deliberate after all, and the payoff was extremely satisfying. Also the afterword by the author was very neat.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt Heppe

    Killer of Men and Marathon Review Characters: Killer of Men and Marathon are both first person accounts of the life of Arimnestos, the son of a Greek blacksmith who grows up to be a fearsome warrior-- a killer of men. The book takes the form of a story being recited to Arimnestos’ daughter by him. As such, we know that 1) he survives and 2) he becomes a great man. What we are left to discover are the trials and tribulations of his strife-torn life. I’ll leave it to say Arimnestos does not have an Killer of Men and Marathon Review Characters: Killer of Men and Marathon are both first person accounts of the life of Arimnestos, the son of a Greek blacksmith who grows up to be a fearsome warrior-- a killer of men. The book takes the form of a story being recited to Arimnestos’ daughter by him. As such, we know that 1) he survives and 2) he becomes a great man. What we are left to discover are the trials and tribulations of his strife-torn life. I’ll leave it to say Arimnestos does not have an easy life. There are many other characters in the books, many with similar sounding names. It is sometimes a challenge to keep the many other characters straight, but the book wouldn’t be the same without the large cast. The novels are too epic in scope to have a small cast. World building: Cameron completely captures the feel of the ancient world. The novel is filled with rich descriptions of geography, economics, technology, religion, arts, and government. This is not done in the form of info-dumping. The culture comes through the story in a very natural manner. Cameron has a scholar’s mastery of the ancient Greek world. Engagement (Willing suspension of disbelief): Killer of Men and Marathon both utterly absorbed me. Once I started reading, I didn’t want to put the books down. There were no jarring or unrealistic elements that pulled me out of the story and into the real world. When you read one of Cameron’s books, you are IN his world. Writing/Mechanics/Editing: I found both novels to be error free. This seems to be increasingly rare, even with professionally edited novels. Cameron perfectly balances a fast-paced, engrossing read, while also getting across important philosophical and political concepts. Cameron also writes action scenes as well as any author I have ever read. Cameron does use a lot of Greek vocabulary in his writing as opposed to using modern alternatives, however the meaning of the Greek terms is easy to pick up in context. To me it enriched the novels. Impact: Cameron’s novels stay with me long after I have finished reading them. One of my favorite elements of his novels (including his Tyrant series) is how well he captures the spirit of the soldier and the profound importance of the “brotherhood of arms”. Arimnestos might be a killer of men, but he is still a human being who feels loss and knows the impact of his actions. The killing in Cameron’s novels is not there for mindless entertainment, it always serves a deeper purpose. I highly recommend these books and eagerly look forward to the next one in the series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Da Silva

    Killer of Men was a book that caught me by surprise. I did not expect to enjoy this novel as much as I did, so I was pleasantly taken aback when I reached the end. The story is a pretty typical hero's journey, with young Arimnestos, a farmer turned warrior-god, fighting, sexing and generally fluking his way through the beginnings of the Greco-Persian war. I would liken this book to the Kingkiller Chronicles or the Gentlemen Bastards series in that it follows a very capable, but utterly flawed pro Killer of Men was a book that caught me by surprise. I did not expect to enjoy this novel as much as I did, so I was pleasantly taken aback when I reached the end. The story is a pretty typical hero's journey, with young Arimnestos, a farmer turned warrior-god, fighting, sexing and generally fluking his way through the beginnings of the Greco-Persian war. I would liken this book to the Kingkiller Chronicles or the Gentlemen Bastards series in that it follows a very capable, but utterly flawed protagonist, who pines after a nigh-mythical woman he can never hold down, and finds himself narrowly escaping from one near-death situation to the next through quick work or quick words. Unlike those other sequences, however, this book tends to refer to the mythological or fantasy elements in vague terms, leaving us wondering whether it really does have any sway over events, which is nice considering the setting. The most unusual part of the book is that it is written from Arimnestos's perspective, as an old man retelling his tale. He writes stream of consciousness style, with the narrative interrupted frequently for the narrator to ask for more wine, or flirt with his grand-daughter's young friends, etc. I found it very appropriate, and didn't feel distracted at all, really. It is a mythological tale, and these are meant to be told as personal stories, complete with people whose names have been forgotten, or details ommitted or exaggerated. A very fun touch, in my opinion, and helped the novel stand out a litte more. I can see some people being turned off by it trying something new, but we're not anyhere near Cormac McCarthy levels of avant-garde here. My only real gripe is that the author is clearly a fan of Greek history, and well-studied in the topic. He oftentimes uses Greek words in the dialogue, and included a handy dictionary in the front of the book. While I appreciated the lesson in ancient Greek, this DID distract me from the novel quite frequently, as I had to flip back and forth at random times until I got all the dialogue. Once you learn the words, you feel accomplished, but it was a little annoying early on in the novel, as it broke up the flow. A thugater could just be a daughter, and a chilton could just be a toga. Aspis could be a shield, and chlamys could be a cloak. You get the point. All told, a wonderful surprise, and I will definitely be reading the rest of the series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This was quite good. I expect good things from Christian Cameron (whom I know better as Miles Cameron), and this delivered. Cameron does medieval combat reenactments professionally, and his hallmark has always been a real knowledge of what medieval combat and tactics were actually like. Dude knows what it's like to fight in armor because it's literally his day job. Killer of Men brings the same authenticity, but this time to the Bronze Age Greco-Persian Wars. So the battles and all were really qui This was quite good. I expect good things from Christian Cameron (whom I know better as Miles Cameron), and this delivered. Cameron does medieval combat reenactments professionally, and his hallmark has always been a real knowledge of what medieval combat and tactics were actually like. Dude knows what it's like to fight in armor because it's literally his day job. Killer of Men brings the same authenticity, but this time to the Bronze Age Greco-Persian Wars. So the battles and all were really quite cool to read, but there were times when it felt a bit shoehorned. I joked that this might have been titled Sharpe's Phalanx, for the way Bernard Cornwell through historical authenticity out the window in order to make sure Richard Sharpe was involved in every major battle against Napoleon (including Trafalger, which makes no sense at all). But the book also had heart. It's told as the main character, an old man, telling the story of his life to his daughter (and a string of suitors and girlfriends he delights in embarrassing). So you know that he's going to turn out OK in the end, but at the same time, he doesn't pull punches with the crap he went through. I'm apparently a particular sucker for stories that you know are going to end tragically, the author keeps TELLING you that it's going to end tragically, but you keep hoping anyway. One last complain: thank Zeus above that Cameron included a list of characters in the beginning of the book. Keeping Arimnestos and Aristides and Archilogos and Aristagoras and Artaphernes sorted would have been impossible otherwise. Even with that, I gave up on keeping track of all the guys named some version of Heracles. An excellent read overall. No cliffhanger at the end, but certainly more to come. Looking forward to the sequels.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clemens Schoonderwoert

    This fantastic book by Christian Cameron is the 1st volume of the "Killer of Men" series. As this has been my very first encounter with this author I have to admit that I'm truly fascinated now, simply because his way of writing is absolutely tremendous about the ancient history of the Greeks, the wars between the Greek states themselves as well as their struggles and brutal battles against their ferocious enemy, the Persians. The book has a lot of historical details, an expansive glossary, an inf This fantastic book by Christian Cameron is the 1st volume of the "Killer of Men" series. As this has been my very first encounter with this author I have to admit that I'm truly fascinated now, simply because his way of writing is absolutely tremendous about the ancient history of the Greeks, the wars between the Greek states themselves as well as their struggles and brutal battles against their ferocious enemy, the Persians. The book has a lot of historical details, an expansive glossary, an informative piece of note with names and personages as well as interesting maps. The story itself is about a man called Arimnestos, who's from Plataea, when war breaks out against their strong neighbours, Thebes, and while they achieve an unexpected victory against Thebes, he's betrayed by his cousin, and so he finds himself now a slave of a citizen of Ephesus, a city under the rule of the Persian king. When Arimnestos begins his perilous journey to freedom he finds himself in a world where an epic confrontation is on the cards between the Greeks and the Persians. While this is happening Arimnestos finds out that he has a special talent, and that that talent will pay well in this world of violence and death, and so he will turn into and become a "Killer of Men", and thus finds his place in a world full of war and death, democracy and tyranny, and freedom or slavery. Highly recommended, because this book is a tremendous tale about the ancient Greeks, and for me this story has been a "Captivating Killer Opener"!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Killer of Men is the first installment of Long War series by a military historian Christian Cameron, some of you may know him as Miles Cameron. Narrated from old age by the protagonist Arimnestos of Plataea to his daughter and her friends. The story started at Boeotia when he was still a boy, dreaming of becoming a bronzesmith like his father but was instead educated with swords and spears and letters. He was betrayed and sold into slavery, but his masters were rich and treated him well, he got t Killer of Men is the first installment of Long War series by a military historian Christian Cameron, some of you may know him as Miles Cameron. Narrated from old age by the protagonist Arimnestos of Plataea to his daughter and her friends. The story started at Boeotia when he was still a boy, dreaming of becoming a bronzesmith like his father but was instead educated with swords and spears and letters. He was betrayed and sold into slavery, but his masters were rich and treated him well, he got the chance of enhancing his skills. He was then released before the battles of the Ionian Revolt started. And these were the battles where he made a name for himself. The author's story-telling style is good, but there were times that the protagonist suddenly comes back to present and asks for wine and make girls blush by giving a comment about sex, that's pretty annoying and I treated it as a nuisance, most of the time it doesn't add anything to the main story. The use of modern words also irritated me, specially that one time when he talks about a man going to the moon o.O But over-all the book is good, the fact that I finished it and didn't end up in my dnf shelf means it's good and kept me interested, maybe I just expected too much history and forgot about the fictional side.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Albert Llop

    I picked these up because I'm a huge fan of Cameron's The Traitor Son Cycle, and it's been my first adventure into the lands of Historical Fiction. I've read all 6 books in the series, but wanted to leave a special review in the first book for those of you deciding wether to pick this up or not. I've read mostly Fantasy and Science Fiction in my life, but the Long War saga has shown me something I didn't even know existed. I liked those genres because I thought the real world wasn't enough, but i I picked these up because I'm a huge fan of Cameron's The Traitor Son Cycle, and it's been my first adventure into the lands of Historical Fiction. I've read all 6 books in the series, but wanted to leave a special review in the first book for those of you deciding wether to pick this up or not. I've read mostly Fantasy and Science Fiction in my life, but the Long War saga has shown me something I didn't even know existed. I liked those genres because I thought the real world wasn't enough, but it turns out our world and our history can be just as exciting. I know things didn't happen exactly like they happened in these books. But I know they very well might, and that Cameron is one of very few people who can probably write a book about war and history and get as close to the real deal as is humanly possible. This is a fantastic story. You'll learn lots of things about Ancient Greece, the Persians, and how people lived back then. You'll have great adventures, learn a bit about the sea, and about fighting. And perhaps even understand how ancient cultures were so much willing to see the divine in their every day chores. Can't recommend this enough!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hazel

    I don't know why I chose this from an e-book collection. I'd never heard of it or its author and was clueless as to content. Didn't see the cover either. Perhaps it was the title's contrast with 'fisher of men'? But I'm loving it so far. I read the first 23% steadily last night, before deciding I should come up for air. I am far from blood-thirsty and war stories are not my thing. But I am interested in human behaviour, and the reasons that we do what we do. So I am interested in war (human beha I don't know why I chose this from an e-book collection. I'd never heard of it or its author and was clueless as to content. Didn't see the cover either. Perhaps it was the title's contrast with 'fisher of men'? But I'm loving it so far. I read the first 23% steadily last night, before deciding I should come up for air. I am far from blood-thirsty and war stories are not my thing. But I am interested in human behaviour, and the reasons that we do what we do. So I am interested in war (human behaviour writ large?) and the reasons we go to war, and the reasons we tell ourselves that we go to war. And how warriors feel in/out of battle. And over the last couple of years I've read Bernard Cornwell's Agincourt and reread War and Peace and now I find myself absorbed in this tale of war among the city-states of ancient Greece.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    The book was not OK in the first pages but It got better the more I read. So my advice to You is just this: Keep on reading! What I have in favor of this book: I love Herodotus, The best book I have ever read (and I have read hundreds of 'em) It's The Illiad of Homer and this guy knows his stuff. Against: It could have been better written (It is confusing at times), There's to much resemblance of this hero to Uhtred of The Last Kingdom. I will keep reading the saga. I love ancient Greece as much as The book was not OK in the first pages but It got better the more I read. So my advice to You is just this: Keep on reading! What I have in favor of this book: I love Herodotus, The best book I have ever read (and I have read hundreds of 'em) It's The Illiad of Homer and this guy knows his stuff. Against: It could have been better written (It is confusing at times), There's to much resemblance of this hero to Uhtred of The Last Kingdom. I will keep reading the saga. I love ancient Greece as much as Christian Cameron so I will see if this improves.

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