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Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe

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Driscoll and Breshears team up again to teach thirteen key elements of the Christian faith that should be held by anyone claiming to be a follower of Jesus.


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Driscoll and Breshears team up again to teach thirteen key elements of the Christian faith that should be held by anyone claiming to be a follower of Jesus.

30 review for Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Cox

    Sadly, most Christians rarely, if ever, put a second's thought into the doctrines of Christianity. Many may even find the title (Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe) to be offensive or controversial. Many, if not most, self-professing Christians may not even know what "doctrines" are or where they stand on the important doctrines that make up the Christian faith. All the more reason that every Christian should read this book (or listen to the audio version). No, not all Christians believe t Sadly, most Christians rarely, if ever, put a second's thought into the doctrines of Christianity. Many may even find the title (Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe) to be offensive or controversial. Many, if not most, self-professing Christians may not even know what "doctrines" are or where they stand on the important doctrines that make up the Christian faith. All the more reason that every Christian should read this book (or listen to the audio version). No, not all Christians believe the same thing. In this title, Mark Driscoll has chosen to go over 13 core Doctrines of Christianity: 1. The Trinity of God 2. Revelation: God Speaks 3. Creation 4. We are made in God's image 5. The Fall (and God's judgement) 6. Covenant: God's Pursuit of us 7. Incarnation of Christ 8. The Crucifixion of Christ 9. Resurrection 10. What exactly is The Church? 11. Worship 12. Stewardship 13. What is the Kingdom of God? Each of these core doctrines is explained with direct Biblical reference from the perspective of the author. Many of these doctrines are debated differently by different groups and Driscoll devotes some time to discussing views different from his own. But he does clearly define his own view as he believes it and presents it to his church. The discussions of each topic were fascinating. As a long time Christian (I am 42 as I write this and was saved at 12), I was honestly astounded at how little this content is discussed by Christians. Or at least that has been the case in my life, churches, and friends. That said, I found the book to be challenging and satisfying at the same time. The author doesn't just state "This is what you should believe" and leave it at that. There is explanation and discussion of what is said about it in the Bible. There is also discussion of pitfalls surrounding some of the doctrines and why people may believe things differently. While the title states "What Christians Should Believe" it may have been even better to have stated "Why Christians Should Believe." If you are a Christian but haven't really put much thought behind some of these topics, this is an excellent resource. Being Christian means putting your faith in the fact that Jesus Christ is the son of God, that he died on the cross in payment for our sins, and that we are all sinners and in need of His saving, healing grace, without which we are doomed to death and hell. Getting that is crucially important. But then we need to take our knowledge further and this book helps explain the foundations of our faith in a way you may never have considered it before. Clearly, this book is targeted at Christians. However, if you're not a Christian, this book is still a good explanation of the core beliefs of Christianity. So often Christianity is misrepresented in the media and by people who call themselves Christian but who simply aren't. Going to a Christian church doesn't make a person Christian, nor does calling yourself one. It's deeper than that. If you are interested in learning more about it, this is a good resource. Even better would be to visit an active local church that teaches the Bible and start some discussions. Or read the Bible yourself. But honestly, this book isn't an impassioned presentation intended to "convert" you. I should mention this book is not "preachy" at all. It is very straightforward "teaching." Some people might consider it very "dry." I felt that it was quite dry at first, but as I kept reading, it was just so interesting, it ended up reading fairly quickly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    There were some topics in here that didn't seem to belong in a book on doctrine. In addition, it seems there was a glaring omission of failing to define what doctrine really means, how the topics covered in each chapter constitute doctrine, and how doctrine differs from, say, theology. There were certainly some good insights in these pages, but certainly also sections tainted by opinion. There was also a lot of content in here which I've seen expressed in other works by other authors who, frankl There were some topics in here that didn't seem to belong in a book on doctrine. In addition, it seems there was a glaring omission of failing to define what doctrine really means, how the topics covered in each chapter constitute doctrine, and how doctrine differs from, say, theology. There were certainly some good insights in these pages, but certainly also sections tainted by opinion. There was also a lot of content in here which I've seen expressed in other works by other authors who, frankly, express it better than the authors did here. I did appreciate the distinction throughout of "open-handed" and "close-handed" issues where the Bible leaves room for multiple interpretations upon which salvation does not rest. So, not bad, but not great.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Bogner

    I read this for one of my classes!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Not being a Driscoll fan, I was surprised how much I enjoyed and agreed with this book. It is very hard to review an audio-book in depth as you don't have a ready reference to which to turn. This book in particular, which is very dense, follows an almost catechetical format, and would be at home in the class-room, took some getting used to in the audio-format. The narration also took some getting used to, something about the inflection in the narrator's voice, I think. However, it was clear and Not being a Driscoll fan, I was surprised how much I enjoyed and agreed with this book. It is very hard to review an audio-book in depth as you don't have a ready reference to which to turn. This book in particular, which is very dense, follows an almost catechetical format, and would be at home in the class-room, took some getting used to in the audio-format. The narration also took some getting used to, something about the inflection in the narrator's voice, I think. However, it was clear and helped understanding. I would recommend reading a text version of Doctrine, but be prepared for some time and work, it's taken me months to get through the audio book (listening in the car when alone). As the title suggests, Doctrine covers major Christian beliefs such as creation, the Bible, sin and judgment (and others, about 13 in all). In some ways it is a reiteration of classic Reformed Evangelical teaching, but adds a contemporary and accessible flavour through the application and illustrations. It is thoroughly biblical, weighing and critiquing alternative views and then often arguing for one based on how they see the evidence. In this way the approach and conclusions are conservative and biblical. The authors affirm 6 day special creation, for example, the eternal conscious punishment of the unrepentant, and the complementarian view of women in ministry. Having said I agree with a lot, I don't agree everything, but only over what I consider secondary matters, and they certainly are very orthodox. In cases of disagreement, their presentation of the alternatives helped me locate and think through my own views on the spectrum. However, there were moments of brilliance, particularly in one of the later chapters dealing with stewardship and consumerism. I started this book when I was a pastor looking for a resource for young adults to get a grip on basic doctrine. I would recommend it for this purpose, although it would probably be best for group work - both to encourage perseverance in reading, and to flesh out the challenging discussion it contains. But even as a post-graduate trained pastor I found it worthwhile and even, in places, refreshing. 3 stars (subjectively on the Good Reads scale, maybe 4 stars if one considers its value) - I like it, but it is hard work and doesn't fit the audio format so well (although if it's the difference between reading and not reading, get it on audio!).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    Potential readers should know off the bat that this book is not really designed to be casually leafed through from the first page to the last. It is a dense black brick with indie rocker artwork and a million footnotes. Which is great in a lot of ways, but it's a disappointment if you're not expecting it. I bought this book because I listened to the original podcasts and really enjoyed them. They were engaging and amusing and thoroughly Biblical. This book retains the last characteristic but bas Potential readers should know off the bat that this book is not really designed to be casually leafed through from the first page to the last. It is a dense black brick with indie rocker artwork and a million footnotes. Which is great in a lot of ways, but it's a disappointment if you're not expecting it. I bought this book because I listened to the original podcasts and really enjoyed them. They were engaging and amusing and thoroughly Biblical. This book retains the last characteristic but basically abandons the humor that typically characterizes a Driscoll communication. As written, this work is more useful as a reference text, with overwhelmingly thorough citations to Scripture and well-reasoned argumentation. Chapters are clearly delineated, so it will be easy for a reader to find a few handy verses to answer, say, an argument that Jesus is not God or that Mary was not a virgin when Jesus was incarnated. I am happy to have this book on my shelf, and I am happy to have read it all the way through so I will know what is available when I need it, but I don't recommend this book for someone who is just looking to borrow a book to answer a few questions about who God is.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Mckinney

    Not the first book on doctrine that I would recommend. It was a worthwhile read as it encouraged me to dwell upon a variety of biblical and theological topics that I hadn't put thought to in a while. Know that this really is just a run-through of what the now defunct Mars Hill church believes, with the range of issues touched on reaching very broad. Given the title ("what Christians should believe") I thought several topics probably should have been left out. Or they could have changed the title Not the first book on doctrine that I would recommend. It was a worthwhile read as it encouraged me to dwell upon a variety of biblical and theological topics that I hadn't put thought to in a while. Know that this really is just a run-through of what the now defunct Mars Hill church believes, with the range of issues touched on reaching very broad. Given the title ("what Christians should believe") I thought several topics probably should have been left out. Or they could have changed the title to "what we believe". That being said, they did do a good job of delineating between "close-handed" and "open-handed issues".

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I read through this together with a few other guys, one chapter a week, as a way of introducing them to reading theology. We then met up each week to discuss. It worked really well in this format and I know all the guys benefited from the discipline of reading and talking about theological concepts, particularly soteriology, eschatology and the Church. The book is an excellent tool to be used as an introduction to theology and it certainly stimulated great discussion and prayer for us. In fact t I read through this together with a few other guys, one chapter a week, as a way of introducing them to reading theology. We then met up each week to discuss. It worked really well in this format and I know all the guys benefited from the discipline of reading and talking about theological concepts, particularly soteriology, eschatology and the Church. The book is an excellent tool to be used as an introduction to theology and it certainly stimulated great discussion and prayer for us. In fact the guys enjoyed it so much they have signed up to do another book (Desiring God by Piper)!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Graham Heslop

    Driscoll and Breshears attempt to do a lot in such a small space: simplifying swathes of systematic theology into digestible portions; showing how Christian theology touches massively on Christian living; and studying the historical context and present cultural setting of their Evangelical Reformed tradition. I think they achieve that for the most part in what is an accessible and rewardingly rich introduction to systematic theology.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Sorenson-Abbott

    I think I had way too high of expectations for this book. I love Mark Driscoll's sermons but I didn't really feel that same passion in his book. Very long, very dense. Took me longer then it should have to finish, (my indicator I wasn't completely into it). Had some solid doctrine and thoughts but I disagreed with several points and felt a lot of questions I had were glossed over or unanswered. Still going to listen to his preaching, but not sure if I will go for another book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Byron

    Reading for Doctrine Series at CBC

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jacob O'connor

    What makes something true?  After all, why study doctrine (a fancy word for "teaching".  Church doctrine simply means what the church teaches) if it's not true?   The fella who wrote this book has since taken a fall.  Maybe he had some ugly ideas and he wasn’t always a nice person, but this takes me to my original question.  If a wayward Christian writes a book about what Christians should believe, isn’t that dangerous?  Well, it depends on what makes something true.  Here's my take.  What Mark What makes something true?  After all, why study doctrine (a fancy word for "teaching".  Church doctrine simply means what the church teaches) if it's not true?   The fella who wrote this book has since taken a fall.  Maybe he had some ugly ideas and he wasn’t always a nice person, but this takes me to my original question.  If a wayward Christian writes a book about what Christians should believe, isn’t that dangerous?  Well, it depends on what makes something true.  Here's my take.  What Mark Driscoll wrote is pretty good.  I didn't find anything that veered outside the lines. It's even helpful as a basic primer on the Christian faith.  This is how I know:  it matches reality.  The truth of a claim or idea has nothing to do with who is making the claim or having the idea.  Driscoll's ideas are true only insofar as they match the Bible -- and they do.  Doctrine is a fine book.  

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mason E Searle

    Excellent book for those wanting a clear and concise view of theology and doctrine. It is filled with easy to understand concepts that expand beyond normal everyday teaching you may hear from the pulpit. While still somewhat introductory to tackling the broad topic of theology and doctrine, it challenges and expands knowledge well. Truly a good read for those starting down a scholastic approach to their faith!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Philip Brown

    Gets the job done as an introduction for beginners. Doesn't go deep into anything that it addresses, but raises a bunch of ideas that someone new to the faith may not have thought of. Enjoyable as a light refresher on topics I've read elsewhere.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Serena Deloglos

    Fantastic primer on Christian reformed doctrine. Thorough and easy to read or listen to. This would be a great intellectual piece to offer a new believer or to those who have been walking with the LORD for some time and want to better articulate their faith.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Travis Wentworth

    No-nonsense and specific language used here to describe the outline of the Bible.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Hixon

    Good content but very heady and so kinda boring

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Shuman

    Read this a while ago and honestly don't remember a lot of it

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brad Atchison

    Doctrine is one of those books that is quite good at trying to blend systematic theology, biblical theology and the application of it while still containing a few unusual quirks. Driscoll's and Breshears's goal is to present a basic evangelical doctrine in which believers may understand their beliefs and worship the Lord that much more. The Book is divided into thirteen chapters: Chapter 1. Trinity: God Is Chapter 2. Revelation: God Speaks Chapter 3. Creation: God Makes Chapter 4. Image: God Loves C Doctrine is one of those books that is quite good at trying to blend systematic theology, biblical theology and the application of it while still containing a few unusual quirks. Driscoll's and Breshears's goal is to present a basic evangelical doctrine in which believers may understand their beliefs and worship the Lord that much more. The Book is divided into thirteen chapters: Chapter 1. Trinity: God Is Chapter 2. Revelation: God Speaks Chapter 3. Creation: God Makes Chapter 4. Image: God Loves Chapter 5. Fall: God Judges Chapter 6. Covenant: God Pursues Chapter 7. Incarnation: God Comes Chapter 8. Cross: God Dies Chapter 9. Resurrection: God Saves Chapter 10. Church: God Sends Chapter 11. Worship: God Transforms Chapter 12. Stewardship: God Gives Chapter 13. Kingdom: God Reigns Each chapter blends systematic questions along with using biblical theology to prove their points. In my personal opinion, his chapters on Worship and Kingdom were the best chapters. The chapter on Worship really addresses issues in practical theology. For instance, these two addresses idolatry and the different types that appear in our lives. They argue that worship is a fundamental part of our life. Driscoll and Breshears do well in not limiting worship to a cooperate event that happens once a week but as offering our bodies as living sacrifices (Romans 12:1-2), which includes corporate worship. Also, this team does a great job of relating regeneration with worship and how that worship will culminate with the full consummation of God's Kingdom. The chapter on the Kingdom of God is also very enlightening. Driscoll and Breshears do a great job at defining the kingdom of God. Here is Driscoll's definition, "The kingdom of God is about Jesus our king establishing his rule and reign over all creation, defeating the human and angelic evil powers, bringing order to all, enacting justice, and being worshiped as Lord." Driscoll also does an amazing job in giving the entire storyline of the Bible in about a page and a half. I have one or two concerns with this book. The first is concern Driscoll and Breshears apparently do not like the historical language of "eternally begotten" and believes it mars the Nicene Creed, along with the procession of the Spirit from the Father and Son. They also are seemly against trying to say much about the eternal relationship between the three persons (The ontological/imminent Trinity) and want to only speak of how they work in creation (the Economic Trinity). This all seems a little concerning to me. First, the Nicene Creed does a good job at distinguishing that Jesus was not made/birthed/etc. but "Begotten". Chalcedon fleshes this out more. Also, it is worth keeping this term because it distinguishes Christ from the rest of us children. Christ is the eternal son, while we are not. I think John 14:28 and the form of John 5:26 fleshes this idea out. Also, though the Economic and Immanent Trinty can be distinguished, they cannot be divorced. We see by the acts that each person does how they interact with each other. John clearly records this in John 17 and speaks of the Spirits procession from John 15:26-27. It just seems odd to turn our back on these categories now when they have been biblically faithful definitions. My other small issue has to do with his application of the incarnation. His application was for us to be "incarnationally missional". Perhaps it's my hyper protectiveness of the Incarnation, but I don't think it is good to jump to this as application. The word Incarnation should only be used for Christ coming into the world. Also, we should first apply the incarnation as a point of worship rather than just a model to replicate. Christ bound himself to a covenant to descend from his heavenly dwelling and all its glory to bind himself to a fleshly body. He then endured the emotional and physical pain of this life, all to culminate at the Cross. At the Cross, he bound sin to himself so that we could be free of the guilt, shame, and bondage that comes from it. The Incarnation is first something to rejoice and worship at rather than to model. I think Driscoll missed this and it's not a small thing to miss. However, these are just small issues that do not detract substantially from the book. Overall, I would heartily recommend this book with the provided caveats. It is definitely worth the read so that you can better understand the story of the Lord and his glory.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Mark Driscoll and Gerry Breshears (Vintage Jesus, Vintage Church, Death by Love) have teamed up on their 4th book together, entitled Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe. In it, the authors seek “to trace the big theological themes of Scripture along the storylines of the Bible” (p. 9). With this structure, readers are walked through chapters like “Trinity: God Is” and “Creation: God Makes” all the way through “Cross: God Dies” and Kingdom: God Reigns.” Filled with Scriptural and bibliograph Mark Driscoll and Gerry Breshears (Vintage Jesus, Vintage Church, Death by Love) have teamed up on their 4th book together, entitled Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe. In it, the authors seek “to trace the big theological themes of Scripture along the storylines of the Bible” (p. 9). With this structure, readers are walked through chapters like “Trinity: God Is” and “Creation: God Makes” all the way through “Cross: God Dies” and Kingdom: God Reigns.” Filled with Scriptural and bibliographical references, Driscoll and Breshears have written basically a popular level systematic theology, one that would be a solid resource in any Christian’s collection of books. While there was definitely value to reading the book straight through like I did, and it would make a great theological introduction for newer believers to get them familiar with the Bible’s big themes, I think the book will actually function best as a reference for the different topics discussed. While I’m not comparing this to Wayne Grudem’s Systematic Theology in terms of depth and scope, most people don’t use that text to read straight through. Instead, you go to it when studying certain topics or have specific questions about what the Bible and other Christians say about different areas. This is how I foresee using this book in the future. The vast indexes will come in handy here. I’m sure there are some out there who will have some difficulty with the book’s subtitle: “What Christians Should Believe.” Our postmodern ethos bristles at claims to have the corner on knowledge of anything, let alone the immutable God of the universe. In reading the book, however, Driscoll and Breshears do a pretty solid job of focusing on areas of vast theological and historical agreement among Christians. When discussing areas where differences exist, the authors’ opinions are made know while presenting other areas fairly. Heresy is called heresy when needed, but the word is used carefully and none within the Orthodox tradition of belief should take offense at the way the doctrines are presented here. As usual, Driscoll was at his best when discussing the cross of Christ. Much of the content of that chapter appeared to be borrowed from Death by Love, which is a fantastic exploration of the different facets of the cross. Driscoll “proclaims” the truths in this chapter rather than just describing them, as the tone slips into in other chapters. The same was true of the final chapter about the Kingdom. The information in the book is solid throughout, but you can almost feel the joy in the proclamation in these chapters. Overall, I would definitely recommend this book as a welcomed addition to any Christian’s library. Not everyone will agree with where the authors’ come down on every topic, but their cases are biblical and summarize the general consensus of traditional, orthodox beliefs in most cases. Doctrine is a very solid, popular-level theological reference to have around.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    What a very educational and informative and VERY well researched book! It seems to cover all the really important Biblical subjects such as creation, the trinity, Jesus' death and resurrection, stewardship, hell, etc. I especially have enjoyed watching Mark Driscoll's Doctrine messages that go in line with each chapter to learn things that aren't included in the book. This was a book that people who want to learn more about their faith can deepen their understanding of things which is great for What a very educational and informative and VERY well researched book! It seems to cover all the really important Biblical subjects such as creation, the trinity, Jesus' death and resurrection, stewardship, hell, etc. I especially have enjoyed watching Mark Driscoll's Doctrine messages that go in line with each chapter to learn things that aren't included in the book. This was a book that people who want to learn more about their faith can deepen their understanding of things which is great for when you get into discussions with non-believer friends or friends who seems to follow false doctrines that don't go in line with the Bible. Also if you are not a believer of Christ, it helps you understand the history and beliefs of Christians. I loved it. There were some chapters I really enjoyed more than others, but overall it was a great read!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    It's a useful resource. It reads well, and is generally a good representation of evangelical theology. Like most systematic theology books, there's bound to be something one disagrees with. Every once in a while, a statement pops up that will leave you scratching your head. For example, when discussing the cross, he argues that God reconciles all people to Himself, but not in a saving way. But, how can you say that someone who is eternally condemned is in any way reconciled to God? Like any syste It's a useful resource. It reads well, and is generally a good representation of evangelical theology. Like most systematic theology books, there's bound to be something one disagrees with. Every once in a while, a statement pops up that will leave you scratching your head. For example, when discussing the cross, he argues that God reconciles all people to Himself, but not in a saving way. But, how can you say that someone who is eternally condemned is in any way reconciled to God? Like any systematic theology, they can't always go as in depth as you would like. At times, controversial statements are made without much explanation (except for a few scripture references in the footnotes, which don't always do the trick). Overall, it has its shortcomings, but it also has some useful insights, and is generally true to the Bible. It's useful.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    This book was a great overview. I like that it was co-authored so the entire book is not just one soul author's opinion. While there were a lot of arguments, ideas, and theories left out or sometime overlooked, this was a book that beginners to theology could understand, grasp, and enjoy. The point was not a deep investigation into every topic filling up hundreds of pages but a general overview of Christianity with broad ideas and topics presented. It's a great start for those wanting to dig dee This book was a great overview. I like that it was co-authored so the entire book is not just one soul author's opinion. While there were a lot of arguments, ideas, and theories left out or sometime overlooked, this was a book that beginners to theology could understand, grasp, and enjoy. The point was not a deep investigation into every topic filling up hundreds of pages but a general overview of Christianity with broad ideas and topics presented. It's a great start for those wanting to dig deeper into some Christian theology, apologetics, and history. While I would have loved to have some of the topics expanded on, the footnotes at the bottom of each page provided great resources and places to look for more in depth information. Mark and Gerry did a great job!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Solid overall and a very good introduction into theology. Many discussions receive brief and still comprehensive treatment. There are a few subjects that are not discussed at all. Namely, the relationship between Israel and the church as in dispensationalism and covenant theology. Likewise, he says nothing of the end times, the tribulation, his view on the millennium, or the rapture. He does not fully bring out the importance of eschatology to Set the world to rights. One weak place also was the Solid overall and a very good introduction into theology. Many discussions receive brief and still comprehensive treatment. There are a few subjects that are not discussed at all. Namely, the relationship between Israel and the church as in dispensationalism and covenant theology. Likewise, he says nothing of the end times, the tribulation, his view on the millennium, or the rapture. He does not fully bring out the importance of eschatology to Set the world to rights. One weak place also was the attributes of God. Some of the stronger chapters are a little unusual, such as the church, "transforms" on worship and gifts and stewardship. Of course his long treatment on the atonement and the gospel are strengths as well. Very comprehensive on what Christ has done for is.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mitch

    This was a surprisingly interesting book. I've had the likes of Driscoll written off for years but he has come around to a much more orthodox view of Christianity. While I don't necessarily agree with him at every turn and I find him making a number of unsupported assertions, this book really is a fairly complete condensation of Christianity. If this was required reading for American Christians, I can't help but think the modern church might be in a slightly different position at this point. He This was a surprisingly interesting book. I've had the likes of Driscoll written off for years but he has come around to a much more orthodox view of Christianity. While I don't necessarily agree with him at every turn and I find him making a number of unsupported assertions, this book really is a fairly complete condensation of Christianity. If this was required reading for American Christians, I can't help but think the modern church might be in a slightly different position at this point. He certainly doesn't mince words in some cases and in others down right flies in the face of the postmodern/seeker church movement that seems to only impress the hip Christians inside its doors. Ironically, it's a movement that he played a large part in popularizing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Kennedy

    [[See full review ht-tp://mydigitalseminary.com/doctrine/]] Doctrine would serve as a good introduction to theology for a young adults (or older) group. As noted above, the approach and language are refreshingly easy, and Driscoll’s name is a drawing point; some might pick up this book merely because he is the author. I have mentioned my concerns above, but overall this is a solid work and mostly achieves what it attempts to do. The book closes with an appeal for the unsaved to place their trust i [[See full review ht-tp://mydigitalseminary.com/doctrine/]] Doctrine would serve as a good introduction to theology for a young adults (or older) group. As noted above, the approach and language are refreshingly easy, and Driscoll’s name is a drawing point; some might pick up this book merely because he is the author. I have mentioned my concerns above, but overall this is a solid work and mostly achieves what it attempts to do. The book closes with an appeal for the unsaved to place their trust in Christ and and Christians to grow in maturity. It’s encouraging that this is more than an academic theology book, but the writers have a deep and visible concern for the reader’s salvation and spiritual health.

  26. 4 out of 5

    J.S. Park

    Leaving behind some of his crude humor, Pastor Mark Driscoll (with Gerry Breshears) has crafted a handy, distilled masterwork of Orthodox Christian belief into a highly readable package. It's the perfect length with great sources, vivid testimonies, and a respectable Christocentric focus. It's a supplement to more thorough works like those by Wayne Grudem or D.A. Carson. Like all systematic theology works, read with discernment. I agree with about 93% of all Driscoll says and writes. In core bel Leaving behind some of his crude humor, Pastor Mark Driscoll (with Gerry Breshears) has crafted a handy, distilled masterwork of Orthodox Christian belief into a highly readable package. It's the perfect length with great sources, vivid testimonies, and a respectable Christocentric focus. It's a supplement to more thorough works like those by Wayne Grudem or D.A. Carson. Like all systematic theology works, read with discernment. I agree with about 93% of all Driscoll says and writes. In core beliefs, he is absolutely solid. It's also perfect for those who are digging deeper into what they truly believe.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Solid. Has some 'moments of glory' in a few outstanding chapters where he really nails it, but also some fairly average chapters that seem not fully formed. Highlights were chapters on Trinity, Image, Incarnation, Cross and Church -- even if you've read him on these topics before, he really nails them in Doctrine. A little slower to read than his other books, but still an accessible intro to systematic theology. I think he struggles at times with the balance between letting loose on his own pers Solid. Has some 'moments of glory' in a few outstanding chapters where he really nails it, but also some fairly average chapters that seem not fully formed. Highlights were chapters on Trinity, Image, Incarnation, Cross and Church -- even if you've read him on these topics before, he really nails them in Doctrine. A little slower to read than his other books, but still an accessible intro to systematic theology. I think he struggles at times with the balance between letting loose on his own personal emphases/hobby horses, and keep the neutral tone of an objective overview. I hope he releases a 2nd Edition in 5 years, seems like a book that would benefit a lot from that.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cory Shumate

    Just finished this awesome work by Driscoll and Breshears. At 450+ pages, it took more than a few days to wade through, but it was well worth it. In this book, the authors work through Biblical doctrines in the order that the Bible presents them, working from Genesis to Revelation. With intensely practical applications appeal to any reader, Christian or not, and very accessible language, this book is no dry systematic theology. It's certainly not exhaustive, but it isn't meant to be. It is compl Just finished this awesome work by Driscoll and Breshears. At 450+ pages, it took more than a few days to wade through, but it was well worth it. In this book, the authors work through Biblical doctrines in the order that the Bible presents them, working from Genesis to Revelation. With intensely practical applications appeal to any reader, Christian or not, and very accessible language, this book is no dry systematic theology. It's certainly not exhaustive, but it isn't meant to be. It is complete with small group tools in the back (chapter recaps, discussion questions, etc.). Recommended for anyone who wants to sharpen up on their doctrine.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I liked this systematic theology. It's more accessible than Grudem or Erikson and has a more "elastic" than most of the conservative theologies. (For example, Driscoll opens the door on an extended creation.) I understand why Mars Hill requires its leaders to read this. It does a nice job of organizing the pieces. Not since seminary have I read a systematic theology, and even then, I took the classes out of order. Going forward, I will likely reread this every two years or so in order to get the I liked this systematic theology. It's more accessible than Grudem or Erikson and has a more "elastic" than most of the conservative theologies. (For example, Driscoll opens the door on an extended creation.) I understand why Mars Hill requires its leaders to read this. It does a nice job of organizing the pieces. Not since seminary have I read a systematic theology, and even then, I took the classes out of order. Going forward, I will likely reread this every two years or so in order to get the big picture. Reading it start to finish over several weeks, helped me see the big picture.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chad Barnes

    This is essentially a systematic theology, but in an entirely different format from, say, Systematic Theology by Wayne Grudem. Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe is written in a highly readable format, comprised of just more than 10 chapters, which would actually be read like a book, rather than treated mainly as a resource like Grudem's. On the other hand, Grudem's Systematic Theology is much more thorough and more easily searchable. I'd recommend this book for people junior high and up.

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