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The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective

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Richard Rohr and Andrea Ebert's runaway best-seller shows both the basic logic of the Enneagram and its harmony with the core truths of Christian thought from the time of the early Church forward.


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Richard Rohr and Andrea Ebert's runaway best-seller shows both the basic logic of the Enneagram and its harmony with the core truths of Christian thought from the time of the early Church forward.

30 review for The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    In this book Richard Rohr and Andreas Ebert explain the enneagram, an ancient personality test used first by Christian ascetics and monks and later by Muslim sufis. It divides people into nine personality types which can be described by their primary need ("need to be perfect", "need to succeed", etc.), their primary sin ("pride", "anger", etc.), or other features. These nine types are arranged in a continuum around a circle, with lines connecting them indicating various relationships to each ot In this book Richard Rohr and Andreas Ebert explain the enneagram, an ancient personality test used first by Christian ascetics and monks and later by Muslim sufis. It divides people into nine personality types which can be described by their primary need ("need to be perfect", "need to succeed", etc.), their primary sin ("pride", "anger", etc.), or other features. These nine types are arranged in a continuum around a circle, with lines connecting them indicating various relationships to each other. The authors give a Christian perspective on the enneagram, meaning that they attempt to show Christians how this can be a very effective tool for personal spiritual growth (which they do very well) and how it is connected to Christian scripture (which they don't do so well). In the end I found the book incredibly helpful. I read it hoping to gain some new ground in dealing with my own brokenness and kindle new growth as a person, and I was not at all disappointed. Seriously, this has been sooo useful, and even 6 weeks after finishing it I find myself thinking about it frequently. It is worth pointing out that the authors recommend not reading the book or making use of the enneagram until one is at least in their 30s--old enough to have realized that our youthful attempts to do away with our flaws through self-improvement aren't going to work. As they see it (and I think I agree) the enneagram is for people who are ready to acknowledge their complete brokenness and throw themselves on the mercy of God. This book is not without flaws. Before the nine types are described there are a few different chapters/essays, some of which are a bit dull and not as helpful as others--I definitely skimmed some. Also, people who place a big emphasis on the Bible as the word of God will likely be bothered by how the authors interact with the text in places. Finally, the enneagram itself comes out of an ancient worldview that at times left me feeling a bit skeptical--there is definitely a mystical view of numbers and geometry, and more than once I found myself wondering how seriously I ought to entertain all the concepts. But again, the overall approach more than made up for the eyebrow-raising aspects. So, despite the flaws this book still gets five stars. It has already been very meaningful and helpful to me and I am sure I will come back to it time and again in the future.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I'm relieved to know that your Enneagram type is supposed to be humiliating because it is. My favorite quote from this book didn't come from the author but Thomas Merton: "The great tragedy of our age is the fact...that there are so many godless Christians--Christians, that is, whose religion is a matter of pure conformism and expedience. Their 'faith' is little more than a permanent evasion of reality--a compromise with life. In order to avoid admitting the uncomfortable truth that they no longe I'm relieved to know that your Enneagram type is supposed to be humiliating because it is. My favorite quote from this book didn't come from the author but Thomas Merton: "The great tragedy of our age is the fact...that there are so many godless Christians--Christians, that is, whose religion is a matter of pure conformism and expedience. Their 'faith' is little more than a permanent evasion of reality--a compromise with life. In order to avoid admitting the uncomfortable truth that they no longer have any real need for God or any vital faith in Him, they conform to the outward conduct of others like themselves. And these 'believers' cling together, offering one another an apparent justification for lives that are essential the same as the lives of their materialistic neighbors, who horizons are purely those of the world and its transient values." The Ennegram attempts to help you identify the root of your sin as well as your area of greatest need to grow so that you might be able to live against your nature and be transformed--all within the scope of God's grace, of course. It was an interesting read--a little dry at times, but I'm a big fan of Richard Rohr.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Richardson

    I feel compelled to believe the connections between the Enneagram and Christian spiritual growth. However, I’d be happy to entertain opposing views. (Type Nine)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Megan Soper

    I started and finished this book in one day plagued with intrigue and deep, vulnerable sadness. The insights are spectacular, deafening, and at times led me to tears of joy and pain which I found beautiful...which I guess is because I'm a 4.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jared Stine

    Just read it

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    There is some insightful stuff here, and I understand this is a pivotal work for the enneagram. I am hoping some of the works that build on it are stronger, though, because Rohr is theologically unsound in places and comes across as arrogant and presumptuous. The gospel of John misquotes Jesus because Hitler abused the statement? Pilate was a three based on a single action for which we do not know the motive? Come on, now.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    I was skeptical about this book for two reason. When something is trendy, like the Enneagram, I hate it by default. (The first version of this book, to be fair, was from the 1980s.) I’ve also done a lot of introspective exercises in the last few years, and at this point I’m a bit skeptical of more of it.The reason is, at some point I think you have to focus less on yourself and more on the rest of the cosmos. I was mentally primed to not finish this book. About halfway through, though, it was ob I was skeptical about this book for two reason. When something is trendy, like the Enneagram, I hate it by default. (The first version of this book, to be fair, was from the 1980s.) I’ve also done a lot of introspective exercises in the last few years, and at this point I’m a bit skeptical of more of it.The reason is, at some point I think you have to focus less on yourself and more on the rest of the cosmos. I was mentally primed to not finish this book. About halfway through, though, it was obvious this would be a five-star review. Like my other five-star reviewed books, this one changed me by making think about the world in a new way. If you haven’t heard of the Enneagram before, you can think of it as kind of an ancient Meyers Briggs Type Indicator, mixed with a little religious mysticism and Hippocrates’ four humors. The Enneagram is kind of like a clock face, only it contains nine numbers instead of 12 numbers. There are nine related Enneagram personality types, and each type provides insight on a different flavor of person. Each flavor has its own strengths, weaknesses, and motivations. While these kinds of tests are systems aren’t new, the authors trace the Enneagram (in various forms), back to Sufi, Christian, and Kabbalah roots. If things ended there, this book would be less interesting. What is most useful in the Enneagram is the connection between the types (see the cover for an idea of the connections). Understanding the connections helps you understand how you can grow as a person for the better and flourish. It can also help you better understand your spouse, your friends, your parents, and your kids. Another benefit of the book is that the authors break down each type by characteristics, motivation, Biblical examples (the authors are Franciscan and Lutheran), Scripture, symbolic animal/color/country, and more. As mentioned above, the book helps you understanding the healthy and unhealthy versions of each type. It uses the more “churchy” terms of “unredeemed” and “transformed”. I can understand why someone would be skeptical of the book, either because the Enneagram is trendy or because this particular book has a religious focus. You may prefer visiting The Enneagram Institute website for more secular information, but I do think this particular book is pretty respectful of lots of schools of thought.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Over dinner one night my friend said, "I'm an Enneagram Type Six, what are you?" From online Enneagram test results, I knew I was a Type One. She went on to talk about the freedom and healing she'd found in knowing her type and what she needed to work on to become a mature and balanced Type Six. That information I didn't find online, but in this book by Richard Rohr and Andreas Ebert. Unlike the familiar Myers-Briggs personality grid, the Enneagram is a cryptic, almost mystical, circle with nine Over dinner one night my friend said, "I'm an Enneagram Type Six, what are you?" From online Enneagram test results, I knew I was a Type One. She went on to talk about the freedom and healing she'd found in knowing her type and what she needed to work on to become a mature and balanced Type Six. That information I didn't find online, but in this book by Richard Rohr and Andreas Ebert. Unlike the familiar Myers-Briggs personality grid, the Enneagram is a cryptic, almost mystical, circle with nine numbered points along the circumference and lines connecting some numbers to others. Each individual strongly identifies with one Type, but there are many variations within a type. Each type also has wings, subtypes, a besetting sin, and directional arrows toward other types that lead to growth or regression. Rohr eases the reader into the Enneagram's descriptions for each Type and reserves the additional complexities for the latter chapters. He begins by focusing on the besetting, often unacknowledged, sin for each type that keeps us from growing and finding the true self God created us to be. Type Ones struggle with Anger, Twos with Pride, Fives with Avarice, Sevens with Envy, etc. Rohr describes the offsetting fruit of the spirit for each sin, the defense mechanisms that hinder maturity, and the emotional pitfalls for all nine types. The authors share personal experiences, and examples from Scripture and church history that put flesh on each type's description. Rather than a "this is what I am" kind-of awareness, the Enneagram leads to movement and transformation. Rather than feeling constrained by a four-letter mold, the challenge to readers is to broaden themselves, see their compulsions and habits redeemed, and encounter God (256-257). Feeling stuck, trapped in ruts you've failed to get out of? Unsure of the path to greater maturity? Rohr and Ebert's book may be the kick in the seat of the pants and the guidebook you need.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I am so glad I took the time to read this book and read it slowly. I didn’t know anything about the Enneagram before this. What a beautiful way of exploring how we approach life and relationship and how to use that knowledge to grow closer to becoming the best versions of ourselves and grow closer to God.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather Mauriello

    The historical information was interesting. There was definitely information that I hadn’t heard yet, as well as some that was review. I still don’t think I fully grasp the whole concept of the false and true selves. But I had to breeze through a lot of it because it was due back for someone else’s hold. Need to check it out again when I have more time to give to reading and thinking!

  11. 5 out of 5

    J.F. Ethan Rose

    I read this book because a group of my friends were into the enneagram and I wanted to know what all the fuss was. After reading this book, I have come to believe that not only does Rohr fail to connect the enneagram to authentic Christian spirituality, but the enneagram itself is an unfit way of understanding the human person and what we have come to call "personality." The enneagram, like Myers-Briggs, is too individualistic and deterministic. I think there are better ways of understanding peo I read this book because a group of my friends were into the enneagram and I wanted to know what all the fuss was. After reading this book, I have come to believe that not only does Rohr fail to connect the enneagram to authentic Christian spirituality, but the enneagram itself is an unfit way of understanding the human person and what we have come to call "personality." The enneagram, like Myers-Briggs, is too individualistic and deterministic. I think there are better ways of understanding people than assigning them a type.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jasonlylescampbell

    Typology always frustrates me as I always feel I don't quite fit anywhere. The thing I liked about this book is that it used the types to attack and expose your sinful tendencies and power-dangers. Of course, those are also your great strengths, but it was not slow in putting them in their place and acknowledging the ways we weild our strengths to trouble the world (rather than better it). It also does help you see the gifts of others ...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    The Enneagram is fascinating. This now classic book is an engaging and well-organized introduction to it, written with humility and spiritual attentiveness. But I'm writing these words in 2019, and there are currently dozens and dozens of books written on the Enneagram from all sorts of different perspectives. There are also very many workshops, websites, and videos that seek to teach and explain it. What makes this book a valuable contribution? More than other books on the Enneagram, Rohr and Eb The Enneagram is fascinating. This now classic book is an engaging and well-organized introduction to it, written with humility and spiritual attentiveness. But I'm writing these words in 2019, and there are currently dozens and dozens of books written on the Enneagram from all sorts of different perspectives. There are also very many workshops, websites, and videos that seek to teach and explain it. What makes this book a valuable contribution? More than other books on the Enneagram, Rohr and Ebert demonstrate the continuity of the Enneagram with Christian tradition, especially the tradition of the "discernment of spirits" from the Desert Fathers and other contemplatives. They also demonstrate how the Enneagram is so valuable; it is basically a tool or map of discovery which enables us to better encounter our "blocks, abysses, pitfalls, defense mechanisms, seductions, distortions, and self-deceptions." It is, therefore, a gift from God. It is a gift that leads us to spiritual growth, maturity, and love. Among some current Christian groups, there is a severe mistrust of the Enneagram for the following reasons: - It feels like a "New Age" fad, arising in the subjective spirituality of 1960s California. - It might encourage a "Theology of Glory," because it speaks of discovering the truth within oneself. - It doesn't seem to have a solid grasp of sin because it labels sin under other headings such as "compulsion, ache, defense mechanism," etc. - It sounds too "Catholic" and too "mystical" for it to be trusted. - It simply replicates other personality tests, such as the Myers-Briggs, but does so in a less accurate and helpful way. - It could encourage an over-focusing on interior movements which is bad because Christians should not be focused on themselves, but on others. If anyone reading this review harbors one or more of these suspicions, then "The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective" is probably the Enneagram introduction you should read. It dispels these points as untruths and distortions. - The Enneagram is similar to many tools of spiritual discernment that Christians such as Evagrius Ponticus and Ramon Lull used in the past. It has always drawn from the storehouse of Christian wisdom. - It is actually a "Theology of the Cross" that is embedded in the Enneagram, because its purpose is to show the fruitlessness and destruction that come from relying on oneself. The Truth is inside because He who is the Way, the Truth, and the Life is inside. I who am made in the image of God must discover all the ways I forget and sully that image. - It is Catholic (Jesuits were the first Christians to teach it) and it is mystical (if by mystical one understands that it ultimately leads to an experience of the heart of God), and some Christians need to learn to be unafraid of that. - It is not a personality test and does not purport to be one. It is a tool of spiritual discernment, to uncover and expose the lies we tell ourselves and the masks we wear. The point of the Enneagram is never to "rest" in a point. That is, the purpose it to journey along the one path to God - the path that one enters by one of the nine points of the Enneagram. - Again, the goal of the Enneagram is to grow in the active love of God and others because it uncovers selfish sins. It notices them and labels them in an effort to set us free from them. The discernment of spirits has always had a place in the Christian tradition because the thorough, inward corruption of sin has always been noticed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary Grace

    The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective isn't the trendiest book on the Enneagram, but it is still a fantastic resource. The chapters are clearly organized, parallel, and oriented around a Christian understanding of this tool. Yes, I do have qualms with Rohr's treatment of a few topics, namely the inerrancy of Scripture. Yes, the reader should carefully consider the Enneagram's roots in eastern mysticism. But I also recognize that Christians are able to have varying perspectives while still seeki The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective isn't the trendiest book on the Enneagram, but it is still a fantastic resource. The chapters are clearly organized, parallel, and oriented around a Christian understanding of this tool. Yes, I do have qualms with Rohr's treatment of a few topics, namely the inerrancy of Scripture. Yes, the reader should carefully consider the Enneagram's roots in eastern mysticism. But I also recognize that Christians are able to have varying perspectives while still seeking Jesus faithfully. Rohr provides a rich outline of the Enneagram's history and gives incredible depth to its dimensions (triads, wings, arrows, degrees of maturation). I appreciated his breakdown of temptations, pitfalls, fruits of the spirit, and invitations to maturity, in addition to symbols and examples of each type. The diagrams and charts are particularly helpful and concise (I have never seen the Lord's prayer broken down according to Enneagram types--it's fascinating). In my perspective, the value in the Enneagram doesn't lie in the type of book that the author writes but in the reader's approach to understanding their own life and their view of what the tool should be. Rohr's final paragraph in the introductory essay of the book demonstrated temperance, wisdom, and humility in bringing the reader to understand this: "As a mirror of the soul the Enneagram remains a tool that can be laid aside at any time. The Enneagram is not the answer, but one signpost among many. Signposts show the way, but we have to take the way ourselves....Until God perfects us and the world, it is advisable to realize and do what can be realized and done--and leave the rest to God."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Wilmotte

    Perhaps the best element of this book is its acknowledgement that learning one’s type is a painful thing. It is hard to see your flaws presented, your pitfalls, and your failings. As a Type Four, it’s also hard to read it and not feel the warm glow of being one of the “special ones” (the pitfall of the Four). In my case, it was also a celebration as I saw how much redemption God has already worked in my sensitive little soul. The book invites one to sober reflection and thought. It has its own f Perhaps the best element of this book is its acknowledgement that learning one’s type is a painful thing. It is hard to see your flaws presented, your pitfalls, and your failings. As a Type Four, it’s also hard to read it and not feel the warm glow of being one of the “special ones” (the pitfall of the Four). In my case, it was also a celebration as I saw how much redemption God has already worked in my sensitive little soul. The book invites one to sober reflection and thought. It has its own failings (most notably a very strange relationship with the Bible, which the authors seem to believe and reject by turns, and some rather rude stereotyping of countries/cultures), but overall I think it is more positive than negative. It will certainly generate thought, reflection, and hopefully conversation.

  16. 4 out of 5

    The

    Richard Rohr and Andreas Ebert have collaborated in “The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective” to add to the many efforts to introduce this time tested source of wisdom. I have learned painfully that I am in danger of making my worst mistakes when I was operating out of my “strengths”. The Enneagram helps to lift up this issue in a way that helps bring to consciousness this danger. Then forewarned can truly be forearmed. The material is presented in a conversational manner making it easy to assimi Richard Rohr and Andreas Ebert have collaborated in “The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective” to add to the many efforts to introduce this time tested source of wisdom. I have learned painfully that I am in danger of making my worst mistakes when I was operating out of my “strengths”. The Enneagram helps to lift up this issue in a way that helps bring to consciousness this danger. Then forewarned can truly be forearmed. The material is presented in a conversational manner making it easy to assimilate. If you don’t know much about this method of reflection this book would be a good place to start.

  17. 4 out of 5

    McKenzie Watson

    This book was essentially my first exposure to the Enneagram, and it was a solid one. I found Rohr and Ebert's overview both comprehensive and detailed enough to be useful in exploring my own type. I would say the book was most useful to me as an overview of the Enneagram as a whole, its purpose and practice.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Ellis

    Enlightening, fascinating, challenging. Worth reading for any Christian interested in the enneagram, or anyone interested in Christian interpretation of the enneagram. The bulk of the book is the second part, discussing the nine enneagram types, but anyone already familiar with these might still find the first and third parts educational. The book seems to be primarily written from a Catholic perspective, though Christians outside of 'the Church' (such as myself) still have a lot to gain from re Enlightening, fascinating, challenging. Worth reading for any Christian interested in the enneagram, or anyone interested in Christian interpretation of the enneagram. The bulk of the book is the second part, discussing the nine enneagram types, but anyone already familiar with these might still find the first and third parts educational. The book seems to be primarily written from a Catholic perspective, though Christians outside of 'the Church' (such as myself) still have a lot to gain from reading it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Megan Ericson

    Great deep dive into the Enneagram. I learned so much about the history of this spiritual personality typing system. Written somewhat academically, I had to read sections over just to grasp the concepts sometimes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donna Pincince

    Helpful book to understand the Enneagram. Not a sit down and read straight through it type of book because there is so much info. I originally borrowed the book but decided to buy my own copy to reference and revisit.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tricia Culp

    Life changing. I'm glad I dove into this world and look forward to understanding more of what it can teach me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Derek Shaw

    I mean, what do you expect? This is the enneagram and Richard Rohr...two of my favorite things! Read it, then come talk to me about it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charity

    One of the meatier books on the subject I've read. Rohr doesn't sugarcoat his take on the various numbers, but frankly and unusually discusses them from a place of intense study and vast experience. (His 4 is rather different from other 4 comparisons I've found!) He also tackles it from a Christian perspective, and includes Biblical examples and some of the saints, which is fun.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    For Christians interested in or fascinated by the Enneagram, this is a must read. While some other presentations of this approach to personality have a very negative feel, Rohr and Ebert look at it as a tool for positive growth and redemption, which feels fresh and hopeful. Their explanation of the differences between the three centers was clearer than any other I have read, and I appreciated their thorough presentation of each type, not just its traits but Biblical, literary, and historical exa For Christians interested in or fascinated by the Enneagram, this is a must read. While some other presentations of this approach to personality have a very negative feel, Rohr and Ebert look at it as a tool for positive growth and redemption, which feels fresh and hopeful. Their explanation of the differences between the three centers was clearer than any other I have read, and I appreciated their thorough presentation of each type, not just its traits but Biblical, literary, and historical examples. The last section in which they look at Christ as the “prototype of the liberated person” and show the ways in which He fulfilled the highest realization of ALL nine types was fascinating. Highly recommend.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jaymie

    Fascinating. Detailed. Great examples. I really enjoyed reading and learning more about all 9 types.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Destrea Havlik

    There is a ton of information in this book. But it has an amazing perspective on the enneagram. I changed and healed in the process of reading it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Helpful but not scripture. To be taken with the wisdom of the Holy Spirit.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sean Post

    Self-assessments are certainly popular. There are plenty of them that claim to give us insight regarding how we work and function. But how helpful are they really? Is the insight that is provided actually meaningful and helpful? In the case of the Enneagram, the answer is "absolutely." Although I didn't know much about the Enneagram before reading this book, apparently many Christians are freaked out by it. The Enneagram is built around the idea that there are basically nine shapes of the human Self-assessments are certainly popular. There are plenty of them that claim to give us insight regarding how we work and function. But how helpful are they really? Is the insight that is provided actually meaningful and helpful? In the case of the Enneagram, the answer is "absolutely." Although I didn't know much about the Enneagram before reading this book, apparently many Christians are freaked out by it. The Enneagram is built around the idea that there are basically nine shapes of the human soul. Each "soul type" (for lack of a better term) has unique strengths and desires which bring alongside with them a dark side. Rohr spends the first half of the book describing the origins of the Enneagram and how it has been used and abused historically. He discusses what the tool can accomplish and what it cannot accomplish. Overall, it seems there is great redemptive potential for this tool in the lives of Jesus-followers. There were a handful of spots in the book where I felt the author reached a little too far in his attempt to describe particular souls (e.g. reaching into an individual's physical appearance). But in general, each chapter was remarkably insightful. After paying ten bucks to take the assessment and then reading the book, I discovered that I am a 3. So if you want to know my deepest longing and my darkest failings as a human being then I guess you'll have to read the book and figure out what it means to be a 3! Along the way, I bet you will gain some insight about yourself and the topography of your soul. And that is a subject well worth devoting a few hours of thought and reflection.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jason Leonard

    Of all that I've read regarding the Enneagram, this is the only work that focuses almost entirely on the redemptive application of the Enneagram. Rohr & Ebert understand that the Enneagram's usefulness is not in finding and operating out of your type. Rather, it is about understanding yourself and what freedom and Christ-likeness look like. The only drawback to this book is that some of the language is too nuanced to be widely applicable. If you identify with their language, you'll find it extre Of all that I've read regarding the Enneagram, this is the only work that focuses almost entirely on the redemptive application of the Enneagram. Rohr & Ebert understand that the Enneagram's usefulness is not in finding and operating out of your type. Rather, it is about understanding yourself and what freedom and Christ-likeness look like. The only drawback to this book is that some of the language is too nuanced to be widely applicable. If you identify with their language, you'll find it extremely helpful. But if you don't really agree with their animals and countries that they relate to each type, it might be a drawback. Other sources of information regarding the Enneagram systematize the language a little more and brush with broader strokes. This isn't enough to drop my review of this book, it's simply something to recognize. If you want to understand how the Enneagram can be a tool for growth and redemption, get this.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David

    I have looked into different ways of categorizing personalities many times, but this was the first time I was confronted with something both insightful and capable of dealing with real complexity. Identifying personality types by means of the ways we cope with the world is brilliant, and sets inner struggles in a whole new light. Not only was this helpful to me as a person (and it was), it was also extremely helpful to me as a writer. Stories are about characters, and they operate on readers. A g I have looked into different ways of categorizing personalities many times, but this was the first time I was confronted with something both insightful and capable of dealing with real complexity. Identifying personality types by means of the ways we cope with the world is brilliant, and sets inner struggles in a whole new light. Not only was this helpful to me as a person (and it was), it was also extremely helpful to me as a writer. Stories are about characters, and they operate on readers. A good understanding of the way people work and the way they change and mature and deal with life impacts both how your characters work and what stories you think need to be told. While I can't give my stamp of approval to absolutely everything offered up in here, or say that there is nothing more to be learned, this book is priceless. Read it.

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