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Vegan Casseroles: Pasta Bakes, Gratins, Pot Pies, and More

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When it comes to traditional comfort food, most of the key ingredients are off-limits to health-conscious vegans. But giving up shepherd's pie, eggplant parm, and cheesy rice casserole was not an option for Julie Hasson, who took on the challenge to recreate flavors she loved, but without the cheese, eggs, butter, and cholesterol. The results are a mix of retro flavors, su When it comes to traditional comfort food, most of the key ingredients are off-limits to health-conscious vegans. But giving up shepherd's pie, eggplant parm, and cheesy rice casserole was not an option for Julie Hasson, who took on the challenge to recreate flavors she loved, but without the cheese, eggs, butter, and cholesterol. The results are a mix of retro flavors, such as Nacho Cheesy Sauce and a lighter Cream of Mushroom Soup, and fresh, veggie-forward dishes like Mediterranean Stuffed Cabbage Rolls and Summer Corn Custard. The recipes come together quickly, focus on healthier substitutions without the tans-fats, and are endorsed by some of the toughest critics, Julie's college-aged children and their visiting friends! With recipes like Zucchini Basil Lasagna and Tamale Pie, you're guaranteed to find a casserole you'll love. You can even make your own casserole creations by pairing any of the super-simple sauces with your favorite veggies and rice or pasta. Of course, desserts are an important cap to any casserole-based meal: satisfy your sweet tooth with dishes like Rustic Bread Pudding. Now: dig in and feel good about it!


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When it comes to traditional comfort food, most of the key ingredients are off-limits to health-conscious vegans. But giving up shepherd's pie, eggplant parm, and cheesy rice casserole was not an option for Julie Hasson, who took on the challenge to recreate flavors she loved, but without the cheese, eggs, butter, and cholesterol. The results are a mix of retro flavors, su When it comes to traditional comfort food, most of the key ingredients are off-limits to health-conscious vegans. But giving up shepherd's pie, eggplant parm, and cheesy rice casserole was not an option for Julie Hasson, who took on the challenge to recreate flavors she loved, but without the cheese, eggs, butter, and cholesterol. The results are a mix of retro flavors, such as Nacho Cheesy Sauce and a lighter Cream of Mushroom Soup, and fresh, veggie-forward dishes like Mediterranean Stuffed Cabbage Rolls and Summer Corn Custard. The recipes come together quickly, focus on healthier substitutions without the tans-fats, and are endorsed by some of the toughest critics, Julie's college-aged children and their visiting friends! With recipes like Zucchini Basil Lasagna and Tamale Pie, you're guaranteed to find a casserole you'll love. You can even make your own casserole creations by pairing any of the super-simple sauces with your favorite veggies and rice or pasta. Of course, desserts are an important cap to any casserole-based meal: satisfy your sweet tooth with dishes like Rustic Bread Pudding. Now: dig in and feel good about it!

30 review for Vegan Casseroles: Pasta Bakes, Gratins, Pot Pies, and More

  1. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    This is a beautiful book with lots of yummy-looking casseroles. However, I file this one under "Unrealistic Cookbooks." Most of these recipes are simply too complicated and use too many ingredients for me to cook on a work night or even a busy weekend day. That's kind of the point of casseroles--you dump some stuff together, pop it in the oven, and you have a hearty meal without a ton of effort. I found a single casserole that I would be willing to make here. This would be a great book for a per This is a beautiful book with lots of yummy-looking casseroles. However, I file this one under "Unrealistic Cookbooks." Most of these recipes are simply too complicated and use too many ingredients for me to cook on a work night or even a busy weekend day. That's kind of the point of casseroles--you dump some stuff together, pop it in the oven, and you have a hearty meal without a ton of effort. I found a single casserole that I would be willing to make here. This would be a great book for a person who has all day to cook, but it's not for me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Honest-to-god vegan comfort food is desperately needed, a need which this cookbook tries to address. The concept is here and flawless, but I would personally have to redo at least 90% of these recipes because so many include a cashew-based cream sauce. Vegan chefs neeeeeeeed to stop using puréed soaked cashews in literally everything they make--ignoring the fact that cashews are not cheap, a TON of young people are allergic to nuts. Nut allergies are super prevalent in people, like, 26 and under Honest-to-god vegan comfort food is desperately needed, a need which this cookbook tries to address. The concept is here and flawless, but I would personally have to redo at least 90% of these recipes because so many include a cashew-based cream sauce. Vegan chefs neeeeeeeed to stop using puréed soaked cashews in literally everything they make--ignoring the fact that cashews are not cheap, a TON of young people are allergic to nuts. Nut allergies are super prevalent in people, like, 26 and under; I honestly know more people with nut allergies than without. Not only that, but the texture of cashew mush is revolting. I can't stand it. And it tastes gross. Please just stop thinking it is a great option. It's not. And these recipes take a lot of work when you include all the fancy sauces you have to make from scratch. Three stars because vegan comfort food is a wildly important, oft ignored food category. Only three stars because it's just not feasible for people my age and younger to make. Clearly, I need to break out into the vegan comfort food cookbook world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie D'Angelo

    This book is a solid 4 star. It's no Isa Does It, but it's full of easy to do recipes that make larger quantities of food. This is a great book for people who like to cook ahead for the week or have a family and like "filling" foods. I found the bad reviews of this book a bit lazy and am confused by them - the author never claims that the recipes can be done especially quickly and the book is full of recipes you would recognize (nothing is "too out there") - It is a casserole cookbook and by con This book is a solid 4 star. It's no Isa Does It, but it's full of easy to do recipes that make larger quantities of food. This is a great book for people who like to cook ahead for the week or have a family and like "filling" foods. I found the bad reviews of this book a bit lazy and am confused by them - the author never claims that the recipes can be done especially quickly and the book is full of recipes you would recognize (nothing is "too out there") - It is a casserole cookbook and by consequence most recipes in it to go into the oven for some amount of time. Almost all recipes have a corresponding picture of the final product. If you're looking for some more straight forward, easy to put together recipes that make a good amount of food, this is a good go-to. It's not a staple, but a good addition to your collection (:

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chelka Posladek

    I appreciate this book because I make casserole-type dishes ALL the time. I like using this book to generate new ideas, and to find vegan versions of things. BUT, I hate that Julie Hasson uses so many weird/unhealthy ingredients. I mean, I get that this is a casserole book, and there's no real way to make potatoes gratin a "healthy" dish. But so many of her recipes call for vegan cheese and soy curls. And it's another vegan cookbook that uses cashews in everything. Personal preference, I know, b I appreciate this book because I make casserole-type dishes ALL the time. I like using this book to generate new ideas, and to find vegan versions of things. BUT, I hate that Julie Hasson uses so many weird/unhealthy ingredients. I mean, I get that this is a casserole book, and there's no real way to make potatoes gratin a "healthy" dish. But so many of her recipes call for vegan cheese and soy curls. And it's another vegan cookbook that uses cashews in everything. Personal preference, I know, but I hate the cashews thing... I feel the same way about this book as I do about "Vegan Diner": good for ideas, but not for following the recipes exactly.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Not a fan of cashew cream, only because of my prior cashew disasters and it seems unnecessary, but otherwise some solid ideas and simple recipes I would never think of myself. Will probably be making some of these soon!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Louise Afanasiw

    I love this cookbook. The recipes are super easy to follow and my husband who is not a vegan has loved everything I've made from this book without exception. Definitely one for a cookbook library!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    I've made about 4-5 recipes and each was easy to make and very flavorful. The "cheese" sauce and crumb topping in many of these recipes gives that traditional comfort feel of a casserole.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a great way for non-vegans to understand what is going on in a vegan recipe. The author explains the non-standard list of ingredients that she uses in her kitchen for taste, texture, and thickening. As a mother to a son with a serious dairy allergy, starting with a vegan recipe and then adding meat if I choose to is easier than trying to substitute out for cheese and butter (mostly cheese- vegan butter works great). I liked it and saved a few recipes for rotation.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This is one of my favorite vegan cookbooks by far. Julie Hasson has recipes in the back for sauces and bases, or you can use pre-packaged bases and improvise. Everything I’ve made from here has been fabulous: breakfast casseroles, quiche, mac n gravy, butternut squash Mac n cheese, and on and on. Amazing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Read

    Although I rarely use recipes and didn't make any of these, this book satisfies quite a bit. Its categories, ingredients, and yields are well done. I read it for inspiration, general methods, and learning proportions, and I think I've a handle on all that. I'm hankering for oven-baked goodness now ... with a browned topping.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    As others have mentioned, the recipes call for many ingredients and have multiple steps. When I think casserole I think time saving; this cookbook is anything but. Decent recipes. Of the ones I tried (vegan dumplings, jambalaya, eggplant parm) I did enjoy them.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nelson

    All the recipes are extremely good it's just that a lot of them call for ingredients that you will have to go to the store to get and they may be difficult to find or at least they were for me

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I pulled a two dip recipes (carmelized onion & nacho cheese) and a mushroom quinoa enchilada I pulled a two dip recipes (carmelized onion & nacho cheese) and a mushroom quinoa enchilada

  14. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    I chose a bunch of recipes, now I will have to try them and see.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    I’m not a fan of cookbooks that list ingredients that are other entire recipes in the book. Especially in a casserole book, which I expected to be quick, throw together meals.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Many blogs have featured this newer cookbook on vegan casseroles. Since so many blogs had giveaways, sample recipes, and glowing reviews, I wanted to give the book a try. Which is a little weird since I never really grew up on casseroles. At least “all-American” casseroles. Sure we had mac and cheese, lasagna, and tuna noodle casserole. But that was mostly it. When I started to cook I was always intrigued by casserole recipes. They were so exotic and foreign to me. So I can’t say if Julie has put Many blogs have featured this newer cookbook on vegan casseroles. Since so many blogs had giveaways, sample recipes, and glowing reviews, I wanted to give the book a try. Which is a little weird since I never really grew up on casseroles. At least “all-American” casseroles. Sure we had mac and cheese, lasagna, and tuna noodle casserole. But that was mostly it. When I started to cook I was always intrigued by casserole recipes. They were so exotic and foreign to me. So I can’t say if Julie has put all the classics in this book, but many looked familiar. She features both American classics (beans and rice, chili casserole, nacho tots) and more traditional cuisine (stuffed peppers, lasagna, mac & cheese). The overall goal of the book was to make quick dinners that give the comforts of casseroles, but were vegan and not too heavy on fats and calories. Photos Compared to most cookbooks reviewed on here, there aren’t that many photos. But truthfully, I doubt that you need a photo for each recipe. Casseroles aren’t the most photogenic food out there. But what I really appreciate is their choice of recipes to photograph. If the dish wasn’t as straight forward as a mixing all the food and baking, they took a picture. For example there was a photo of the stuffed cabbage or lasagna. These aren’t traditionally thought of “casseroles” but fit the definition. The photos that are available are beautiful and presents the foods as something delicious and appetizing. It is interesting to see some reviews online and see the not-so glamorous shots of the dishes. Not to say the blogger casseroles look disgusting, but the photos in the book are just a little more inspirational. Set-up The book opens with a very short intro. I think this was a smart choice. If you are picking up a book about specific vegan foods, there is a good chance you already know a good bit about veganism. You are going to know all the different vegan substitutes, which foods aren’t vegan, and the benefits of lifestyle. The book jumps right into the recipes, dividing them up as appetizers, dutch-oven casseroles, old favorites, pasta, vegetable, desserts, and “staples.” The staples section is filled with sauces, and crumbles for recipes. Although it was a pain to flip back and forth for some recipes between the nacho sauce and the casserole, it wasn’t too big of a deal. It was a little easier because by the end I started to memorize the sauce recipes, needing the flip pages less and less. Writing The writing is brief and to the point. This book had a small opening, and jumps rather quickly to the recipes. She keeps the length down in the recipes. There aren’t any long stories, cultural references, stories about the recipe development, just a short paragraph describing the dish. Sometimes she suggests how to enhance a dish (like in the Rice & Beans being served with lettuce, avocados, and salsa). This makes and easy read that isn’t distracting from the recipes. Overview The biggest criticism I’ve read about this book is how “unhealthy” the recipes are. I get it, what one considers healthy is subjective. I would say yes, these recipes are vast improvements on the originals. Casseroles are known for using cream, cheap meats, cheese, and canned soups. Some recipes use fake cheese, faux meats, and other processed ingredients. But realistically, you are using mostly whole ingredients that are commonly found in kitchens. Many of the “fakes” can be taken out, or is listed as “optional.” The serving sizes are huge and decently low calorie. I plugged in the ingredients in a calorie counter, and I found that the recipes have lots of nutrition. Another arguement for the “it’s unhealthy” debate is that some foods are not made from scratch. This is true, but Julie Hasson points out in the book, if you want you can make your own seitan, soy cheese, or tater tots, but a casserole is suppose to be easy to make. You can do this with ALL of your food. You can make your almond milk, bread, dog food, kombucha, beer, etc. But we as humans can only do so much. That is why bakers, butchers, and restaurants showed up. We can only do so much. It is just your decision. I think the important thing to put into perspective are the goals of the book. Julie Hasson wanted to make vegan versions of classic casseroles. They are suppose to be affordable, which they were. They were also suppose to be to a certain degree less processed, which most recipes didn’t use processed products. And the final criteria was that the recipes were suppose to be easy. Each recipe varied on the amount of worked required, but overall they were pretty eat to make. I don’t think there wasn’t anything that my husband and I didn’t like. There is definitely some foods that saved better than others, or little tricks to making it turn out better. But overall, I would recommend this book to pretty much any vegan. If you want to read my individual reviews of the recipes please check out my blog post

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brindi Michele

    hardly any photos to accompany recipes...meh.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Another tome in my quest for something new to feed the folks at my table. Some interesting takes but nothing really new, to me; an old hand at trying new foods. My vegan adventure ended 20 years ago but after the few years I spend eating exclusively plant products I'm still filling our table with plant based meals and any help along the way is good. I highly recommend, especially to newer cooks, you'll find lots of ideas to use and base experiments off of.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    Yuck. I didn't like the format of this book, I didn't like the lack of photos, I didn't like that most recipes use other recipes (make this with all these ingredients and then add in the cheese sauce/soy curls (what the heck are those anyhow???) where the recipe is on page xx with all these other ingredients) -- arg. That's a lot of didn't likes. Don't recommend. Going back to the library quickly.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Mustread

    Great pictures and nice layout encouraged me to skim through this book. Many of the recipes look and sound delicious BUT would I ever try any – doubtful! Many require a blender and for personal historical issues I am anti-blender. Therefore, I can only hope that Amy's frozen entrees might duplicate some of these recipes.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carina Johnson

    I am not a huge casserole fan but was able to find a couple recipes that I want to try. Maybe some styles from other countries would have made this more interesting. Not just typical American.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Not very good. Not one recipe I would like to try. Maybe because it's nothing new.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Wills

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chrysanthemum T

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

  29. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen N

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